Apple Egpu Developer Kit For Mac

Posted : admin On 05.06.2019
Apple Egpu Developer Kit For Mac Average ratng: 7,1/10 398 reviews

I wonder if Apple's own Thunderbolt 3 -> Thunderbolt 2 adapter will work with the Sonnet-based eGPU developer kit in 10.13 High Sierra. No mentioned if this on Apple's eGPU page yet. No mentioned. The redesigned Mac App Store includes a new Ratings and Reviews API for Mac apps built using the macOS 10.14 SDK. For information about how to ask your users for ratings and reviews from within your app, see the SKStoreReviewController developer documentation and the Human Interface Guidelines.

Very interested in some of the eGPU options out there. I'm specifically interested in these two: This seems to be a bare bones option and doesn't include charging: This one includes additional ports and an internal SATA III connection: This may sound obvious, but I'm thinking that the bare bones akitio node might be better from a performance perspective if you keep it on a dedicated thunderbolt 3 controller and use a different thunderbolt controller to connect to things like hard drives etc. Has anyone tried out different configurations with eGPU's? Honestly that's not really helpful.

Options for performance mac machines at this point are building Hackingtosh, which obviously isn't supported or editing a kernel extension plist values which I guess is not supported. Supposedly the TI83 controller on the external board is supported so technically all of the individual hardware pieces (depending on the graphics card) is supported. I see this as a pretty reasonable option given the circumstances and I'm willing to take the risk or I could just bootcamp into windows where everything is supported and it works just fine. Honestly that's not really helpful. Options for performance mac machines at this point are building Hackingtosh, which obviously isn't supported or editing a kernel extension plist values which I guess is not supported. Supposedly the TI83 controller on the external board is supported so technically all of the individual hardware pieces (depending on the graphics card) is supported.

I see this as a pretty reasonable option given the circumstances and I'm willing to take the risk or I could just bootcamp into windows where everything is supported and it works just fine. While it may work, it is in no way supported. The latest version of macOS (Sierra) does not have any. This means that any update can break its functionality. Basically, an eGPU enclosure (doesn't matter if it's based on TB3, TB2, or TB1) to macOS is no different that a hackintosh: it's un-supported hardware. As long as your ok with it potentially breaking at anytime, you can explore your options.

For GPUs, Nvidia just literally announced new drivers, for macOS Sierra, for its Pascal-based GPUs. Check out the press release for the. Nvidia Pascal would be your best bet for the most GPU performance now, given that the card you want will fit in your desired eGPU enclosure. At this point I have it working and I have a lot more respect for those who kept saying it wasn't supported.

I think its still worth the cost/effort for me, but probably not for most people. After following all of the steps in the video I was surprised to learn that specific combo (the RX 480) was no longer working as of the 10.12.4 update. I never thought it wouldn't be supported since I knew that it was used in older Mac Pro's and is the desktop equivalent to the cards currently shipping with the MacBook pro's. Its my understanding that the update actually bricked the Mac Pro's with the card in them.

I was also surprised to learn that Apple actually will limit what you can do on the bootcamp windows side of things as well. So I was wrong and there are hoops you will have to go through on that side as well. At this point since I have it working for OSX I haven't bothered to research how to get it setup on the windows side. I was able to get OSX to recognize the card using these instructions: And to get the eGPU script to work I just did a find and replace in textedit to switch all instances of 9500 with 9510 - as mentioned in this forum post: I'm not sure if any of that is redundant, but it does actually work now. But I should specify that it works per OS X 10.12.4 and the 13in touch-bar MBP late 2016 (thunderbolt 3).

Anyone finding this post via google should not assume this is still working. It still requires rebooting every time you connect/disconnect, but that doesn't bother me too much. I keep the Node connected on the rear left port and when booting I keep another device connected on the adjacent port. To try and keep the full lanes open to the eGPU I disconnect whatever I have plugged in there. I can also confirm that the power supply connection is not enough - it will need to be an actual device.

Apple approved egpu

For now I have been using my keyboard through a USB A to USB C adapter and that will work. In practice it does perform well, but I would recommend not putting too much faith in the benchmarks - it is still a fairly sizable performance drop vs a desktop with a GPU. I'm currently using a pretty dated monitor so I typically play at 1600 by 1000 and I don't play particularly taxing titles - mostly blizzard games like starcraft and diablo III. I am able to comfortably play with very high settings at that resolution, but I do notice periodic load spikes. I assume with the thunderbolt connection there is some challenge when refreshing textures. I didn't dig into it too hard, but there are probably optimal setups as well - perhaps avoiding CPU calculations like physics will keep the game running better and avoid taxing the thunderbolt connection. Overall I'm pleased with the setup.

This feels like the best balance between performance and portability. When I'm on the go I'm fine with the built in graphics and I'm not lugging the additional battery required for the GPU. When I am at my desk I can reboot and get reasonably good performance with the GPU.

Egpu

Also my setup is overall quieter. The Node is probably louder at idle than my laptop by itself at idle, but it doesn't get any louder when I load up a game whereas those small fans on the laptop can get pretty loud under load. Next I plan on getting a 4K monitor now that I'm confident I can use it. I also want to get a more functional dock to go along with the node. I'm thinking about this one: I really hope that Apple embraces the eGPU setup and software gets better at dealing with the bandwidth limitations.

I wonder if eGPU support in macOS is just here to enable development of graphically intensive apps with just a laptop, or if Apple really wants to bring eGPU to Mac users. It seems pretty clear to me that it's the former, at least for now. For end users, these types of applications are a support nightmare. TB3 has really variant implementations which is why the companies that do make them make a point of stating that they absolutely will not guarantee or support operation with anything other than their own laptops. That doesn't really sound like the sort of user experience Apple tends to push. If they make their own, you'll know they are interested in selling the concept to consumers.

Apple Egpu Developer Kit For Mac Os

The spring 2018 date will be when they release their own hardware that will 'just work', tied in with that new 'modular' Mac Pro. Until then devs can use the Sonnet box, given its constraints around sleep and login and external displays.It seems of odd to think Apple would give developers one box and customers another box. That sounds like a recipe for bug galore. That's how it has always been. The Intel transition happened with Pentium 4 boards in G5 cases, the dev box for the nMP was a 2012 cheesegrater with two 5770s.

I think the setup will require some playing around to get the best possible performance. Right now I'm trying to figure out how is the best way to connect to a dock that can provide power, a wired network connection, and other USB ports.

The kit comes with a USB dock, which is interesting. I was thinking about getting a thunderbolt dock, but would it be even better to get a USB-C dock with power? Does the USB controller share resources with the thunderbolt controller or is it independent? That might help me get some use out of the other USB-C port on the side of the laptop where I connect the node and it will probably be cheaper as well. I'm curious: How much would you be willing to pay for an Apple-branded eGPU box?

Do you think Apple would ship a version of such a box without a card in the box? Not sure regarding question # 2, but I do think whatever they come out with will share some design concepts potentially with the graphics card implementation being developed for the next Mac Pro. I don't know what implications can be gleamed from the developer kit cost, but $599 for a $300 eGPU box and $250 graphics card seems like a decent. good deal. Not as cheap as a console, but probably on par with buying a second gaming box. That said I doubt they will sell just an external GPU enclosure with or without the GPU - its basically a box with a power supply and a thunderbolt controller in it. On the other hand, if they do make a flashy new thunderbolt 5K monitor with integrated GPU then I would be willing to pay a small premium (assuming it is as functional as the previous thunderbolt monitor).

Hopefully it will have configuration options, but you know they won't put an NVIDIA card in it.Edit - saw some RX 580's on B&H for $250 - not sure why Amazon is so high.