Sony Dsc-f717 Driver For Mac

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Sony Dsc-f717 Driver For Mac Average ratng: 9,1/10 4900 reviews
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Support for Sony DSC-F717 5MP Digital Camera is available from the publisher or the manufacturer. PCDriverDownload cannot be held liable for issues that arise from the download or use of this software. Here you can view online and download Sony DSC-F717 (serv.man3) Service Manual in PDF. DSC-F717 (serv.man3) service manual will guide through the process and help you recover, restore, fix, disassemble and repair Sony DSC-F717 (serv.man3) Digital Camera. Remote Control manuals and user guides SONY DSC-F717 Sony Electronics Inc. 680 Kinderkamack Road, Oradell. Registered under Sections 302/148/149/109 of the Pakistan Penal Code and Section Hi I am so.

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MSRP $708 US. 5.0-megapixel CCD for resolution to 2,560 x 1,920 pixels. Faster autofocusing and accurate results with NightShot, NightFraming, and Hologram Autofocus technologies. Dramatically improved white balance performance, better color. Ultra-sharp 5x zoom lens (f/2.0-2.4 too!), now with manual zoom control via lens ring.

Excellent color (improved over F707), automatic noise reduction Manufacturer Overview Sony Electronics Inc. Has long held a dominant position in the digicam marketplace, with a wide range of models enjoying enormous popularity with consumers. Currently, they're maintaining what's arguably the broadest line of digicams in the industry, with multiple models in a number of distinct product lines.

Last year, they rocked the camera world by introducing the F707, a five megapixel model with a tack-sharp Carl Zeiss lens and a host of unprecedented features, all for under $1,000. The F707's infrared-based Night Shot and Night Framing modes and the completely unique Hologram Autofocus created a camera that could quite literally shoot (and focus) in total darkness. This year, Sony's obviously listened hard to feedback from the F707 users (and reviewers!;-) and came out with an impressive update in the form of the F717. While basic specs are still the same (the same lens and CCD), the new model incorporates numerous improvements across the board.

The user interface has been revamped, so the lens ring can now control both focus and zoom. (A subtle change that makes a noticeable difference in the camera's usability.) Autofocus speed has been markedly improved, as have color rendering and white balance performance. (The F717 now holds the title of the fastest-focusing (across its full zoom range) consumer digicams I've tested so far, as of 8/29/2002) The F717's autofocus system is also considerably more sophisticated than that in the F707, incorporating the 5-zone AF system first seen on this year's Mavica CD-400. I don't know to what extent my own harping on the issue may have contributed (this was an issue I'd really climbed on my soap box over with all the high-end Sony cameras), but Sony has now included a generic hot shoe flash connector on the F717, allowing users to couple generic auto flash units and studio strobes to the camera. The individual improvements in the F717 range from subtle to obvious, but taken collectively they result in a dramatic upgrade to the F707. Model upgrades of this sort are almost never enough to tempt owners of the previous model to trade in their cameras for the new version, but I think the F717 will be an exception to that rule. The overall improvement in camera performance (AF speed), capability (the hot shoe), ease of use (the combined zoom/focus ring), and image quality (color rendition and white balance) are enough that there's a compelling case to be made for current users to sell their 707's and upgrade to the new F717.

If you liked the F707, I can guarantee you'll love the F717. If you were drawn to the F707, but couldn't get past limitations like the missing hot shoe, or its overzealous rendering of certain shades of red or green, the F717 may very well win you over.

Sony has always done very well in the 'consumer' space, but has had difficulty making inroads with the true 'enthusiast' market. The DSC-F717 could easily change all that: If advanced users give it an honest look, setting aside their 'Sony isn't a camera company' prejudices, I'm confident a lot of them will end up buying the 717. This review is still a 'first look,' as Sony told me they're still tweaking image parameters (color, tone, etc) as of the version of firmware in the model I have. So final judgement will have to await my testing of a production model. I have to say though, that what I've seen in the prototype is very, very encouraging. The color has none of the oversaturation problems the F707 had with bright greens and reds, and the auto white balance processing is flat-out among the very best I've seen in any camera at any price. Stay tuned for test images from a production model at some point in the (hopefully near) future, but in the meantime, start saving your pennies - You're going to want one of these!

High Points. 5.0-megapixel CCD delivering image resolutions as high as 2,560 x 1,920 pixels. (4.94 million effective pixels.).

1.8-inch color LCD monitor. Electronic Viewfinder (EVF) with data display. Optional 'live' histogram display in viewfinder. 5x optical zoom with 2x Precision Digital Zoom.

9.7-48.5mm Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar lens, equivalent to a 38-190mm lens on a 35mm camera. Five-point autofocus for challenging lighting situations, plus Manual focus option and adjustable AF area. Industry-leading autofocus speed and shutter delay. Hologram AF assist light for low-light and low-contrast focusing. NightShot and NightFraming IR modes for 'no light' framing and shooting.

Through-the-lens (TTL) flash metering. Adjustable apertures from f/2.0-2.4 (!) to f/8.

Full Auto, Program AE, Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, and Manual exposure modes, plus four preset Scene modes. Shutter speeds from 1/1,000 to 30 seconds. Adjustable ISO with sensitivity equivalents of Auto, 100, 200, 400, and 800. White Balance setting with five presets and a manual setting. Dramatically improved automatic white balance operation. Improved color rendering.

Multi-Pattern, Center-Weighted, and Spot metering options. Built-in, pop-up flash with four modes. External flash hot shoe and connection socket. HQX Movie with sound recording mode (recording duration limited only by memory card capacity). 'Burst 3,' Auto Exposure Bracketing, E-Mail, Voice, and 10-second Self-Timer modes. Uncompressed TIFF, GIF, and JPEG image file formats (movies saved as MPEG).

Image storage on Sony Memory Stick (16MB stick included). DPOF (Digital Print Order Format) compatibility. Power from Sony NP-FM50 lithium-ion battery pack or AC adapter (included). Significantly improved battery life relative to the F707 (an hour more in record mode, more than four hours more(!) in playback). AV Cable with NTSC and PAL format options. USB cable (supports USB 1.0 and 2.0) and software CD for quick connection to a computer. Dimensions of 6.31 x 4.88 x 2.63 inches (162 x 124 x 68mm), 23 ounces (658 grams).

Comparing the Sony DSC-F717 to the previous DSC-F707 For those readers already familiar with Sony's DSC-F707 (or perhaps owning one and contemplating an upgrade to the DSC-F717), here's a concise list of differences between the two models. (I'm not positive this list is exhaustive, as I don't have a comparison of this sort from Sony, but I think I've managed to hit all the major points.) Some of the information below is from the camera's specification chart and manual, other data is based on my own performance tests. Feature DSC-F717 DSC-F707 Observations from my own testing Color rendering Much more neutral Tended to oversaturate strong greens and reds. (Effect was strongest on colors that were already highly saturated.) Auto White Balance Performance Exceptional - Handles an enormous range of color temperature very well, including mixed sources.

Not bad, in fact a bit better than average relative to other cameras I've tested. Not on the same level as that of the F717 though. Shutter Lag. Autofocus: 0.63-0.65.

Manual Focus: 0.136. Prefocus: 0.120.

Autofocus: 1.06-1.11. Manual Focus: 0.60. Prefocus: 0.18 Startup Time 1.8 seconds 2.6 seconds Battery Life. Capture/LCD: 233 min.

(!). Playback: 522 min. (!!). Capture/LCD: 180 min. Playback: 286 min. First time is for immediate switch after pressing shutter, second is time to display image from quiescent state in capture mode.

NOTE though, that the camera shows a preview of the image right after the exposure anyway, so the first time may not be relevant in normal usage. Shutter lag, full autofocus 0.63/0.65 Shorter time is for wide angle, longer time is for telephoto. Very fast, compared to the rest of the prosumer field. (Average is about 0.8 seconds for high-end prosumer digicams.) Shutter lag, manual focus 0.136 Very fast. (Average is 0.5 seconds.) Shutter lag, prefocus 0.120 Very fast.

(Average is 0.2-0.3 seconds.) Cycle Time, max/min resolution 1.47-3.2 1.8 54-67 First row is for large/fine files, first number for first 9 shots, writing to buffer memory, second is average for shots 9+. Second row is for small/normal files. (Didn't find end of buffer.) Last time is range for full res TIFF files. Cycle time, continuous mode ('Burst 3' mode) 0.47/12.34 0.47/4.35 Captures three images, then needs to wait 4.35 (low res) or 12.3 (high res) seconds for buffer to clear before capturing the next burst of 3 shots. Overall, the DSC-F717 is a very fast camera, beginning with a great startup time thanks to not having to telescope its lens before it can shoot.

Autofocus speed is exceptional - This is one of the very fastest 'prosumer' cameras I've tested to date, as of late August, 2002! (The Fuji S602 Zoom is slightly faster at wide angle, but a good bit slower at telephoto.) Shutter lag in manual focus mode is the best I've seen on a prosumer camera model, and prefocus lag time is excellent as well. No matter how short, I'd always like to see shutter lag be lower still: Even the 0.63-0.65 seconds of the F717 is still longer than I'd like to see. That said, Sony deserves high praise for raising the bar on the other camera manufacturers in this regard. Big kudos to the engineers! Cycle times are very good as well, at 1.47 seconds between shots in large/fine mode, and (oddly), 1.8 seconds in small/normal mode.

The 717 has a roomy buffer memory too, as it can snap up to 9 shots in large/fine mode before slowing to wait for data to flush to the Memory Stick. And even when the buffer is full, cycle time is still a very respectable 3.1 seconds for maximum resolution files. In burst three mode, the F717 captures frames at intervals of 0.47 seconds, a rae of 2.37 frames/second. And in Ultra HS mode, the frame rate is nearly 30 fps.

About the only thing the F717 doesn't do very quickly is write full-sized TIFF images to the card. Times I measured here varied a fair bit, but the average was around 60 seconds per file. (!) Another huge improvement relative to the F707 is that the F717 doesn't 'penalize' you for pressing the shutter button too quickly after the previous shot.

With the F707 (and a lot of other cameras as well), if you press the shutter button immediately after the previous exposure, the camera won't fire the shutter until you release the shutter and then press it again. In this situation, the F717 exhibits the (greatly) preferred response of simply firing the shutter as soon as it's able to do so. After the somewhat leisurely AF response of the F707, the speed of the F717 was welcome surprise and a great accomplishment on the part of Sony's engineering team.

Dsc F717 Sony Camera Battery

Combined with its long, sharp 5x zoom lens, the F717's speed makes it about the best 'sports' camera I've seen yet for under $1,000. Operation and User Interface The F717 packs a lot of camera controls into a relatively small space, making good use of the left side of the lens barrel to spread the controls out a bit. The panoply of external controls may seem a bit much at first, but I always appreciate having as much external control as possible, as it saves having to scroll through menu items for common settings. Given my prior experience with the F707 model, I quickly adapted to the F717's control layout, which has only subtle differences. Even novice users should be able to quickly adapt to the F717's control setup though, as it's very logically laid out.

The Mode dial on top of the camera controls the main exposure mode, while things like Flash mode, Macro mode, White Balance, Exposure Compensation, etc. Are all controlled via small buttons, either on the rear panel or along the left side of the lens barrel. The Command dial, located in front of the Shutter button, lets you quickly adjust aperture and / or shutter speed without accessing a menu system, a nice touch. I also liked the precise control offered by the zoom toggle, with its slow or fast zoom operation, as well the dual-purpose use of the Focus / Zoom ring. Overall camera operation is smooth and efficient, with an easy-to-navigate LCD menu system and a user interface that doesn't require a long learning curve. You may spend a few minutes reading through the manual, but once you get the hang of things, the user interface is quite intuitive.

Control Enumeration Shutter Button: Located on the right side of the top panel, on an angled ridge that slopes down toward the front of the camera, this button sets focus and exposure when pressed halfway. Fully depressing the button fires the shutter. When the Self-timer is enabled, fully depressing the Shutter button begins a 10-second countdown before the shutter fires.

Exposure Compensation Button: Adjacent to the Shutter button, this button highlights the exposure compensation adjustment on the LCD screen. Once highlighted, the exposure compensation is adjusted by turning the Command dial (below). A second press of the button removes the highlight. Command Dial: Directly in front of the Shutter and Exposure Compensation buttons, this black, notched dial controls various exposure settings in any Record mode.

In Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority, and Manual exposure modes, it controls exposure compensation, aperture, and / or shutter speed settings. Turning the dial scrolls through the available settings, while a quick press of the dial selects the setting for adjustment (highlighting it in yellow on the LCD screen). Once the setting is selected, it can be adjusted by turning the dial forward or backward. Manual Focus / Zoom Adjustment Ring: Surrounding the end of the lens barrel, this notched collar adjusts the focus when the camera is in Manual focus mode. When the camera is set to Auto focus mode, this ring controls the optical and digital zoom settings. Through the Setup menu, the ring can be programmed such that either clockwise or counterclockwise motion moves the lens toward the telephoto end of its range. (Regardless of the direction of the zoom setting, clockwise rotation of the ring (as seen from the rear of the camera) always reduces the focal distance.) Open Battery Compartment Switch: Located on the right side of the camera (as viewed from behind), this sliding catch unlocks the compartment door, revealing the battery and Memory Stick compartments.

Mode Dial: Sitting atop the Power switch, this notched dial controls the camera's operating mode. Choices are Full Auto (green camera icon), Program AE (black camera icon), Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, Manual, Scene, Setup, Movie, and Playback modes. Power Switch: Located underneath the Mode dial on top of the camera, pushing this switch forward turns the camera on or off.

NightShot / NightFraming Switch: To the left of the Mode dial, this switch activates either the NightShot or NightFraming modes, for low-light and no-light shooting and framing. The center position returns the camera to normal operation. Four Way Arrow Pad: Located in the top right corner of the camera's rear panel, this rocker pad has four arrows, one pointing in each direction (up, down, left, right). In any record mode (except Movie), the Up arrow controls the Flash mode, cycling between Auto, Forced, and Suppressed. The Left arrow controls the Quick Review function, which provides a quick playback of the most recently captured image.

The Right arrow activates the Macro shooting mode, and the Down arrow activates the Self-Timer mode. In Playback mode, the Right and Left arrows scroll through captured images. The Up and Down arrows control the playback volume. When an image has been digitally enlarged, pressing the center of this button returns to the normal view.

In all camera modes, the arrow keys navigate through settings menus, highlighting menu options. Pressing the center of the pad confirms menu selections.

Menu Button: To the left of the Four Way Arrow pad is the Menu button, which activates and deactivates the settings menus in all camera modes (except for Setup mode, which automatically displays the menu upon entering the mode). Index Button: Adjacent to the Menu button on the left, this button calls up a nine-image index display in Playback mode. Pressing the button a second time activates an information display for the thumbnail image selected, reporting the main exposure information for the currently selected image.

A third press returns to the normal, single-image display. Display Button: Located to the right of the viewfinder eyepiece, this button controls the on-screen information display in all camera modes (except Setup mode). It also enables the histogram display.

Repeated presses cycle through no/limited information, detailed information, and detailed information with histogram display. Finder / LCD Switch: Just above the top left corner of the LCD monitor, this switch directs the viewfinder display to either the viewfinder eyepiece (EVF) or the LCD monitor. Diopter Adjustment Dial: Positioned directly above the viewfinder eyepiece, this dial adjusts the viewfinder to accommodate far- or nearsighted users. White Balance Button: Located on the left side of the lens barrel (as viewed from behind), this button cycles through the available White Balance settings: Auto, Daylight, Cloudy, Fluorescent, Incandescent, and One-Push (manual setting).

One-Push Button: Just to the left of the White Balance button, this button sets the One-Push white balance, based on a reading from a white card held in front of the lens. Metering Button: Directly above the White Balance button, this button cycles through the Multi-Pattern, Center-Weighted, and Spot metering options. AE Lock: Above the Metering button, this button locks the exposure reading until it's pressed again, or until the Shutter button is pressed. Zoom Rocker Button: Slightly protruding from the middle of the lens barrel, this rocker button controls the optical and digital zoom in any Record mode. In Playback mode, this button controls the digital enlargement of captured images, as much as 5x.

Focus Switch: To the left of the Zoom rocker button, this sliding switch alternates between Auto and Manual focus modes. In the Auto position, it also enables the Focus / Zoom ring to control optical and digital zoom. Camera Modes and Menus Full Auto Indicated on the Mode dial by a green camera icon, this mode places the camera in charge of everything apart from flash, zoom, resolution, and record mode. (Think of this as a quick way to get back to the camera's default settings, without disturbing all the settings you've made in various menus.) Program AE: Marked on the Mode dial with the black camera symbol, this mode puts the camera in control of aperture and shutter speed, while you control all remaining exposure decisions.

Shutter Priority (S): Shutter Priority mode lets you control the shutter speed, from 1/1,000 to 30 seconds, while the camera selects the best corresponding aperture setting. You retain control over all other exposure variables. Aperture Priority (A): As the opposite of Shutter Priority mode, Aperture Priority mode lets you the aperture setting, from f/2 to f/8, while the camera chooses the best shutter speed.

All other exposure controls are under your control. Manual Exposure Mode (M): This mode provides total control over the exposure, as you're able to select both aperture and shutter speed independently of each other, as well as control all other exposure variables. Scene (SCN): Scene mode offers four preset shooting modes to choose from - Twilight, Twilight Portrait, Landscape, and Portrait - which set the camera's exposure controls for photographing each specific subject. The available exposure settings depend on the scene selected. Twilight and twilight portrait both enable camera-determined exposure times longer than 1/30 second. Twilight mode disables the flash, while Twilight Portrait enables it.

Landscape mode sets the exposure system to prefer smaller apertures, for greater depth of field. Portrait mode is the opposite, setting a bias toward larger apertures, for less depth of field. Movie Mode: Marked on the Mode dial with a film strip icon, this mode allows the user to capture moving images with sound. Record Menu: In each of the above recording modes, pressing the Menu button calls up the following menu selections. Some options are not available in all modes, and the options in the various Movie modes are sufficiently different that I've listed those menus separately, below. ISO: Sets the camera's light sensitivity to Auto or 100, 200, 400, or 800 ISO equivalents.

(Not available in Scene mode.). Scene: (Scene mode only.) Determines the preset shooting scene. Choices are Twilight, Twilight Portrait, Landscape, and Portrait. Image Size: Sets still image resolution to 2,560 x 1,920; 2,560 (3:2); 2,048 x 1,536; 1,280 x 960; or 640 x 480 pixels. Picture Quality: Changes the JPEG compression level to Fine or Standard.

Record Mode: Enables the F717's special recording modes. Choices are TIFF, Voice, E-Mail, Exposure Bracketing, Burst 3, and Normal. (See the earlier portions of this review for descriptions of these options.). Flash Level: Adjusts the flash brightness to High, Normal, or Low.

Picture Effect: Accesses the F717's creative effects menu, with options for Solarize, Sepia, and Negative Art. Sharpness: Adjusts the overall image sharpness from -2 to +2 in arbitrary units. Movie Mode Menu - MPEG Movie Option: MPEG Movie mode has only two options on its record menu:. Image Size: Sets Pixel dimensions and quality level of the MPEG movies that the camera creates. Options are:.

320 (HQX) - Records 320 x 240 pixel movies, recording at 16 frames/second, and sampling the sound at 10 KHz. 320 x 240 - Also records 320 x 240 pixel movies, but the frame rate decreases to 8 frames/second, and the sound sampling to 4 KHz. 160 x 112 - Records 160 x 112 pixel movies, recording at 8 frames/second, and sampling the sound at 4 KHz.

Picture Effect: Accesses the F717's creative effects menu, with options for Solarize, Sepia, and Negative Art. Movie Mode Menu - Clip Motion Option: The Clip Motion movie-mode option records up to 10 images and then combines them into a single animated GIF file. (A basic stop-frame animation capability.) Here are the options available on the record menu for Clip Motion recording:. Image Size: Sets the size of the final file. Options are Normal and Mobile. Normal corresponds to an image size of 160x120 pixels.

Mobile creates animated GIFs that are 120x108. Flash Level: Adjusts the flash brightness to High, Normal, or Low. Picture Effect: Accesses the F717's creative effects menu, with options for Solarize, Sepia, and Negative Art. Sharpness: Adjusts the overall image sharpness from -2 to +2 in arbitrary units. Movie Mode Menu - Multi Burst Option: Multi Burst mode records 16 small images in very rapid sequence. Here are the menu options available for this mode:. Interval: Sets the interval between success frames in the Multi Burst sequence.

Options are 1/7.5, 1/15, and 1/30 seconds. (That is, available frame rates are 7.5, 15, or 30 frames/second.). Picture Quality: Changes the JPEG compression level to Fine or Standard.

Picture Effect: Accesses the F717's creative effects menu, with options for Solarize, Sepia, and Negative Art. Sharpness: Adjusts the overall image sharpness from -2 to +2 in arbitrary units. Playback Mode: Indicated on the Mode dial with the traditional green arrow Playback symbol, this mode allows the user to scroll through captured images on the Memory Stick. Images can be deleted, protected, copied, resized, rotated, or set up for printing on DPOF devices. Movie files and Clip Motion animations can also be played back. Pressing the Menu button displays the following options:.

Folder: Selects which folder to be played back, and displays the number of files, creation date, and folder name for each. Delete: Deletes the currently displayed image from the Memory Stick. Protect: Write-protects the current image, preventing it from being erased or manipulated in any way (except from card formatting). Also removes protection. A set of arrows appears on the LCD display, letting you scroll through captured images and mark others for protection as well. Print: Marks the current image for printing on a DPOF device, or removes the print mark.

Like the Protect option, lets you scroll through other images on the card.(Only works for still images.). Slide: Activates an automated slide show of captured images. You can set the frame interval and whether or not the show repeats. (An interesting note - Slide shows will play back movie files stored on the memory card too, so you can mix movies with still images in a slide show.). Resize: Resizes the currently displayed image, with all resolution settings available.(Only works with still images.). Rotate: Rotates the currently displayed image 90 degrees clockwise or counterclockwise. (Only works with still images.).

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Divide: Activates the in-camera movie editing function. (Only works with MPEG movie files.) Setup Mode: This mode lets you change a variety of camera settings. The Setup menu is displays immediately upon entering the mode. Five separate screens of options are available, selected via a tabbed interface running down the lefthand side of the screen. (Another change from the F707, which had only three screens on the setup menu. The F717's options are grouped more logically by function, and there are a couple of new ones.). Camera 1:.

Moving Image: Sets the type of file that will be recorded in Movie mode. Options are MPEG movies, Clip Motion animations, or Multi Burst sequences.

Date / Time: Determines whether the Day and Time or Date is overlaid on the image. Digital Zoom: Enables or disables the 2x Precision Digital Zoom on or off. Red-Eye Reduction: Enables or disables the Red-Eye Reduction flash mode. Hologram AF: Enables or disables the Hologram AF system. Conversion Lens: Configures the camera to work with a conversion lens. Camera 2:.

Expanded Focus: Turns the Expanded Focus option on or off. Expanded Focus automatically enlarges the on-screen image 2x while focusing in Manual Focus mode. Bracket Step: Determines the amount of exposure variation in an Exposure Bracketing series. Choices are 0.3, 0.7, or 1.0 EV steps.

Hot Shoe: Turns the external flash hot shoe connection on or off. Zooming Setup: Sets the direction of rotation of the Focus/Zoom ring for controlling the zoom operation.

(That is, one option is for clockwise rotation to zoom toward telephoto, while the other is for counterclockwise rotation to zoom to telephoto.). Memory Stick Tool:. Format: Formats the Memory Stick, erasing all files (even 'protected' ones). Create Record Folder: Creates a new folder for recording images. (The camera assigns the name to the folder though.). Change Record Folder: Selects the folder for recording images. (The display for choosing the active folder is more useful than many I've seen, showing the folder name, the number of files it currently contains, and the date and time it was created.).

Setup 1:. LCD Brightness: Controls the brightness of the LCD display.

Options are Bright, Normal, and Dark. LCD Backlight: Controls the backlight for the main LCD, options are Bright and Normal. (NOTE that this option only appears when the camera is running from battery power - connecting the AC adapter automatically sets the brightness to 'Bright', and removes this option from the menu.). EVF Backlight: Controls the backlight for the electronic viewfinder, options are Bright and Normal.

Beep: Turns the camera's beep sounds on or off. The 'Shutter' option enables only the shutter release sound. Setup 2:.

File Number: Sets the file numbering to Series (which continues file numbering from one Memory Stick to another) or Reset (resets file numbering with each new card). USB Connect: Sets the USB connection type to PTP or Normal. (PTP is a fairly new connection option, supposedly requiring no host driver software. This protocol is apparently supported by Windows XP and Mac OS X.). Video Out: Selects the A/V Out signal timing as either NTSC or PAL. Language: Selects either Japanese or English as the menu language.

Clock Set: Sets the camera's internal clock and calendar. Image Storage and Interface The F717 uses the proprietary Sony Memory Stick format for image storage. A 16MB Memory Stick is supplied with the camera and cards are currently available up to 128MB. (Rumors are that sizes as large as 1 GB will be available by the end of 2002.) Individual images can be write-protected from accidental erasure (except through card formatting) via the Protect option under the Playback settings menu. Individual write-protection also prevents the image from being rotated, but does permit resizing and trimming, since those operations don't disturb the original image, but rather make a new copy. The entire Memory Stick can be write-protected by sliding the lock switch on the stick into the locked position, which also guards against the stick being reformatted.

A new feature with the F717 is the ability to set up individual folders on the Memory Stick. You can thus manage images by folder and choose where images will be recorded. This could be handy if you wanted to organize your photos by events, date, etc. (This will likely become a larger issue as memory stick capacity increases in the future.) The F717's LCD monitor reports storage information in the detailed information display, including the current number of images captured, how many additional images can be stored (based on current image resolution and quality settings), while a small graphic shows you approximately how much space is left on the Memory Stick.

(In Movie mode, the camera reports the available recording time remaining.) Through the Playback settings menu, you can designate whether the camera numbers each image sequentially (from one Memory Stick to the next), or restarts file numbering with each new Memory Stick inserted. The Playback menu also offers a Resize option, as well as a Rotate tool. The camera's Digital Print Option Format (DPOF) compatibility allows you to mark specific images for printing on a DPOF-compatible printer. Through the Setup menu, you can decide whether or not to print the date and / or time on the image as well.

Image Size options include 2,560 x 1,920; 2,560 (3:2); 2,048 x 1,536; 1,280 x 960; 640 x 480; and 320 x 240 pixels (E-Mail recording option). Movie file sizes are 320 (HQ), 320 x 240, and 160 x 112 pixels for MPEG Movies, or 160 x 120 and 80 x 72pixels for Clip Motion files. In addition to the uncompressed TIFF file format, the F717 offers both Fine and Standard JPEG compression levels, and a GIF option for the Clip Motion recording mode. The table below shows the approximate still image capacities and compression ratios for a 16MB Memory Stick (main resolution sizes): Image Capacity vs Resolution/Quality Fine Standard Uncompressed TIFF Highest Resolution 2560 x 1920 Images (Size) 6 2.6 MB 11 1.3 MB 0 Approx. Compression 6:1 10:1 1:1 14.7 MB High Resolution 2048 x 1536 Images (Size) 10 1.6 MB 18 865 KB - Approx.

Compression 6:1 11:1 - Standard Resolution 1280 x 960 Images (Size) 25 634 KB 46 342 KB - Approx. Compression 6:1 11:1 - Low Resolution 640 x 480 Images (Size) 98 162 KB 246 65 KB - Approx. Compression 6:1 14:1 - (Some perceptive readers may wonder why the F717 can only fit one TIFF image on a 32MB card, given that the TIFF file is only14.7 MB, and therefore less than half the size of the card's capacity.

The reason is that Sony's TIFF modes always save a standard large/fine JPEG file along with the TIFF, which in the case of the F717 takes up about another 2.6 MB. The combination of the two files amounts to about 17.3 MB, and so only one will fit on the included 32 MB card.) As mentioned earlier, the F717's movie recording is limited only by the available memory space on the card. Here's a brief table, showing the amount of recording time available in each of it's MPEG movie modes, with a 32 MB card (as included with the camera) and with the 128 MB size that is the largest currently available (early September, 2002). Maximum Movie Recording Time 32 MB 128 MB 320 HQX 1m 28s 5m 52s 320 x 240 5m 54s 23m 36s 160 x 120 22m 50s 91m 20s. The F717 is also accompanied by a USB cable for quick connection to a PC or Macintosh computer, as well as a software CD containing interface software and USB drivers.

The USB connection supports both USB 1.0 and 2.0. Data transfer is very fast: I clocked a download of a 7,353 KB file at 11.3 seconds, a transfer rate of 651 KB/second. This is about as fast as I've measured on any USB-connected camera, but in fact the transfer rate was most likely limited by my 500 MHz PowerMac's USB 1.0 connection, more so than by the camera itself. Download this image-recovery program so you'll have it when you need it. Since we're talking about memory and image storage, this would be a good time to mention the following: I get a ton of email from readers who've lost photos due to a corrupted memory card.

It's tragic when it happens, there are few things more precious than photo memories. Corrupted memory cards can happen with any card type and any camera manufacturer, nobody's immune.

'Stuff happens,' as they say. A surprising number of 'lost' images can be recovered with an inexpensive, easy to use piece of software though.

Sony Dsc-f717 Driver For Mac Download

Given the amount of email I've gotten on the topic, I now include this paragraph in all my digicam reviews. The program you need is called PhotoRescue, by DataRescue SA. Read our of it if you'd like, but download the program now, so you'll have it. It doesn't cost a penny until you need it, and even then it's only $29, with a money back guarantee.

So download or while you're thinking of it. (While you're at it, download the PDF and guide as well.) Stash the file in a safe place and it'll be there when you need it. Trust me, needing this is not a matter of if, but when. PhotoRescue is about the best and easiest tool for recovering digital photos I've seen. (Disclosure: IR gets a small commission from sales of the product, but I'd highly recommend the program even if we didn't.) OK, now back to our regularly scheduled review. Video Out The F717 comes equipped with an Audio / Video cable for connection to a television set. (Through the Setup menu, users can select NTSC signal format for U.S.

And Japanese systems and PAL for European systems.) Once connected to the TV, you can review images and movies or record them to videotape. US cameras ship with an NTSC-compatible cable in the box. Presumably European models would include cables with PAL-compatible connectors. Power The F717 is powered by an NP-FM50 InfoLITHIUM battery pack (M series) and comes with an AC adapter which doubles as an in-camera battery charger. InfoLITHIUM battery packs contain a chip that exchanges information with the camera, allowing the camera to report approximately how many minutes of battery life are left at the current drain level.

This information is displayed on the LCD monitor and the electronic viewfinder with a small battery graphic. The AC adapter plugs into a small socket on the camera's back panel (lower left corner). It can run the camera without a battery inserted, or charge the battery when the camera isn't in use. The Li-Ion battery packs used in Sony cameras prevent us from making our usual direct power measurements, but the good news is that the InfoLITHIUM system reports projected camera runtime while the battery is being used in the camera. Despite the F717's excellent battery life and the excellent feedback provided by the InfoLITHIUM system, I still recommend users purchase and pack along a second battery, though. (Another advantage of the Li-Ion technology used in the InfoLITHIUM batteries is that they don't 'self-discharge' like conventional NiMH rechargeable cells do, and so can hold their charge for months on the shelf or in your camera bag.) Operating Mode Battery Life Capture Mode, w/LCD 233 minutes Capture Mode, w/EVF 236 minutes Image Playback, w/LCD 522 minutes (!) Image Playback, w/EVF 544 minutes(!) The F717's run times from the 'M' series InfoLITHIUM battery are really exceptional.

(This is another area of major improvement relative to the F707 - That camera did very well, but the 717 easily surpasses it. Nearly four hours (about 3 hours and 53 minutes) in capture mode with the LCD on is practically unheard of in prosumer digicams. And well over 8 hours in playback mode is almost unbelievable. I still strongly recommend purchasing a spare battery (Murphy's Law, you know), but it 's much less a necessity with the F717 than with most digicams. Even better news for pros and avid amateurs is that there's finally an external battery pack available to fit Sony digicams with the style power connector used by the F717 - See my. The DPS-9000 is a very high capacity pack, so it should fuel the power-thrifty F717 for a long time! Included Software The software they didn't include.

(But that you should) Few people realize just how.much. you can improve your digicam images through clever processing in Photoshop. Greatly (!) increased sharpness, reduced noise, and even ultra-wide dynamic range (light-to-dark range) by combining multiple exposures.

Fred Miranda and uber-Photoshop expert Fred Miranda has packaged some of his Photoshop magic in a collection of powerful and affordably priced 'actions.' , the results are pretty amazing! Camera manuals are (sometimes) fine for knowing which button does what, but where do you go to learn how and when to use the various features? Dennis Curtin's 'Shortcourses' books and CDs are the answer. (Cheap for what you get, too.) for the camera reviewed in this article. The evaluation unit of the F717 didn't come with any software, but I assume the production model will ship with a package similar to that of the F707 (MGI PhotoSuite SE and MGI VideoWave III SE for both Windows and Macintosh platforms). MGI PhotoSuite SE retrieves images from the camera in a very organized manner, allowing you to view them with a slide show or in album format, and then set them up for printing.

In addition to traditional photo editing and manipulation tools, PhotoSuite offers a variety of templates to help you turn your images into mock magazine covers, sports cards, greeting cards, and calendars. Combined with the camera's Picture Effects menu options, MGI PhotoSuite SE allows you to be very creative with your images. MGI's VideoWave III SE provides minor video editing and enhancement tools, allowing you to cut out frames, add music, and apply creative effects. In the Box Included with the DSC-F717 are the following items:. Neck strap. Lens cap with tether.

16MB Memory Stick. NP-FM50 InfoLITHIUM battery pack.

AC adapter. AV Cable. USB cable. Software CD. User Guide and registration information Test Results ( Late-breaking note: I've now shot and uploaded a full set of test images, from a production-level F717. The results are pretty impressive. There's still a bit of oversaturation in strong reds, but it handles greens much better than did the F707.

Check out the F717's for all the test shots and my detailed analysis of them. I'll come back and update the Test Results digest below and other notes throughout this review in a day or two, once I can get a couple of other pressing items cleared and out of the way with. The info below is just a digest anyway though, see the, for all the details.) The test sample this review is based on was an early prototype of the F717, so Sony didn't want me to post any photos from it yet. What I saw was very impressive though, so I've included a few informal comments below. Overall, it seems that Sony addressed some of the areas where the 707 was weak, really listening to users and reviewers to build on the strengths of what was already an excellent camera. As I said earlier, I think the DSC-F717 will go a long way toward convincing people (at least those open-minded enough to be convinced) that Sony can build 'enthusiast' cameras to match anyone's. I'll update this section as soon as a production sample arrives, and I have a complete set of test images, but meanwhile, here are my impressions thus far:.

Color: While I can't form any firm conclusions about the DSC-F717's color (due to the prototype status of my test unit), what I saw was very encouraging. Colors were hue-accurate, and saturation was excellent across the board. (Neither too much nor too little.) Although the tendency didn't appear too strongly in my standard test subjects (which I'm now addressing by shooting a wider variety of subjects as time permits), F707 users found that it tended to oversaturate bright reds and greens. This tendency was much less pronounced with less intense colors, but the camera did get a little carried away with bright hues in those parts of the spectrum. The prototype F717 seemed to have completely corrected that tendency, as it produced beautiful, accurate color in virtually every circumstance. As I noted in the body of the review, the really big news with the 717's color is how well the camera handles a wide range of light sources with just its Auto white balance setting. I won't be able to make a final judgment on this until the production model arrives, but so far, this is looking like a near breakthrough in white balance processing.

. BT-015, LB-082, AL-013, UJ-002, AJ-005, SW-379 BOARD, FP-583, FP-584 FLEXIBLE CONTROL SWITCH BLOCK (FZ51050) CONTROL SWITCH BLOCK (PW51050) 5. REPAIR PARTS LIST EXPLODED VIEWS ELECTRICAL PARTS LIST (SY-080 BOARD) 2002I0500-1 ©2002.9 Sony EMCS Co.

9-929-994-51 Published by DI Customer Center. DSC-F717 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page Section Title Page ADJUSTMENTS 1-5. LCD System Adjustments 6-38 LCD Initial Data Input (1) 6-39 Before Starting Adjustment 6-1 LCD Initial Data Input (2) 6-39 1-1. Adjusting Items when Replacing VCO Adjustment (PD-179 Board).

DSC-F717 SECTION 6 COVER COVER ADJUSTMENTS Before starting adjustment EVR Data Re-writing Procedure When Replacing Board The data that is stored in the repair board, is not necessarily correct. Perform either procedure 1 or procedure 2 or procedure 3 when replacing board. DSC-F717 COVER COVER 1-1. Adjusting items when replacing main parts and boards When replacing main parts and boards, adjust the items indicated by z in the following table. Replaced parts Block Mounted parts Board replacement replacement replacement Adjustment section Adjustment. DSC-F717 COVER COVER 6-1.

CAMERA SECTION ADJUSTMENTS 1-1. PREPARATIONS BEFORE ADJUSTMENTS 1-1-1. List of Service Tools. Oscilloscope.

Color monitor. Vectorscope. Regulated power supply. Digital voltmeter.

Frequency counter. Calculating machine capable of calculating hexadecimal numbers. DSC-F717 1-1-2. Preparations Note 1: For details of how remove the cabinet and boards, refer Pattern box to “2. Note 2: When performing only the adjustments, the lens block and boards need not be disassemble. 1) Connect the equipment for adjustments according to Fig.

6-1- 2) Connect the Adjusting remote commander to the FR-194 board CN305 via CPC-12 jig (J-6082-436-A). DSC-F717 CONTROL SWITCH BLOCK (FZ51050) MANUAL FOCUS BLOCK (MF51050) Need not connected SY-080 BOARD Need not connected CN101 LENS BLOCK CN702 CN701 CN303 MIC/ CD-408 BOARD SPEAKER UNIT CONTROL SWITCH BLOCK To MS SOCKET (TY-014) (PW51050) CN304 CN309 CN306 CN308.

DSC-F717 1-1-4. Precautions 1. Setting the Switch Unless otherwise specified, set the switches as follows and per- form adjustments. FOCUS switch (FZ51050 block S308).

EXPOSURE button (PW51050 block S404). DSC-F717 4. Preparing the Flash Adjustment Box A dark room is required to provide an accurate flash adjustment. If it is not available, prepare the flash adjustment box as given below; 1) Provide woody board A, B and C of 15 mm thickness. DSC-F717 COVER COVER 3.

A Page table 1-2. INITIALIZATION OF A, B, D, E, F, 7, 9 PAGE Note 1: Fixed data-1: Initialized data.

DATA (Refer to “1. Initializing the A, D Page Data”) 1-2-1. Initialization of A, D Page Data Note 2: Fixed data-2: Modified data. DSC-F717 1-2-2. Initialization of B, E, F, 7, 9 Page Data 3. B Page Table 1. Initializing B, E, F, 7, 9 Page Data Note 1: Fixed data-1: Initialized data.

Note: If the B, E, F, 7, 9 Page data has been initialized, (Refer to “1. DSC-F717 5. F Page Table Note 1: Fixed data-1: Initialized data. (Refer to “1. Initializing the B, E, F, 7, 9 Page Data”) Note 2: Fixed data-2: Modified data. (Refer to “2. Modification of B, E, F, 7, 9 Page Data”).

DSC-F717 Address Initial value Remark Address Initial value Remark AWB 5800K standard data input 1 AWB 5800K standard data input 2 Mechanical shutter adj. AWB 5800K standard data input 3 9C, 9D Fixed data-1 (Initialized data) AWB 5800K standard data input 3.

DSC-F717 6. 7 Page Table Note 1: Fixed data-1: Initialized data.

(Refer to “1. Initializing B, E, F, 7, 9 Page Data”) Note 2: Fixed data-2: Modified data.

(Refer to “2. Modification of B, E, F, 7, 9 Page Data”).

DSC-F717 COVER COVER 1-3. VIDEO SYSTEM ADJUSTMENT 1. Composite Video Level Adjustment Adjust the sync level of the composite video signal output and check the burst level of the composite video signal output. Mode PLAY Signal Arbitrary Measurement Point Video terminal of A/V OUT jack (75 Ω. DSC-F717 COVER COVER 1-4. CAMERA SYSTEM ADJUSTMENTS After completing the camera system adjustments, release the data setting: Before perform the camera system adjustments, check that the specified values of “VIDEO SYSTEM ADJUSTMENTS” are sat- Order Page Address Data Procedure isfied. DSC-F717 Picture Frame Setting How to reset the zoom and focus when they deviated: Mode CAMERA Order Page Address Data Procedure Subject Color bar chart (Standard picture frame with the zoom lens at WIDE end) Measurement Point Video terminal of A/V OUT jack (Note 2) (75 Ω.

DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 1. HALL Adjustment Mode CAMERA Subject Not required Measuring Instrument Adjusting remote commander Adjustment Page Adjustment Address 58 to 5D, 68 Note 1: Check that the data of page: 6, address: 02 is “00”.

DSC-F717 2. Flange Back Adjustment Adjusting method: RadarW RadarW RadarW (Using the minipattern box) Order Page Address Data Procedure The inner focus lens flange back adjustment is carried out auto- Perform “Data setting during matically. In whichever case, the focus will be deviated during camera system adjustment”.

DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 3. Flange Back Adjustment 3-2. Flange Back Adjustment (2) (Using the flange back adjustment chart and Perform this adjustment after performing “Flange Back Adjust- Subject More than 500 m Away) ment (1)”.

The inner focus lens flange back adjustment is carried out auto. DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 4. Flange Back Check Processing after Completing Adjustment: Mode CAMERA Order Page Address Data Procedure Subject Siemens star (1.0 m from the front of the lens) (Luminance: 200 to 400 lux) Measurement Point Check operation on monitor TV. DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 5. Compensation 6.

Mechanical Shutter Adjustment Compensate the unevenness of the iris meter sensitivity. Adjust the period which the mechanical shutter is closed, and com- pensate the exposure. Mode CAMERA Mode.

DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 7. Light Value Adjustment 8. Mixed Color Cancel Adjustment Adjust the standard LV value. To perform mixed color cancel adjustment based on data of each color in color bar. DSC-F717 9. Auto White Balance 3200K Standard Data Input 1 10. Auto White Balance 3200K Standard Data Input 2 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW Adjust the white balance standard data at 3200K.

Adjust the white balance standard data at 3200K. DSC-F717 11. Auto White Balance 3200K Standard Data Input 3 12. Auto White Balance 5800K Standard Data Input 1 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW Adjust the white balance standard data at 3200K.

Adjust the white balance standard data at 5800K. DSC-F717 13. Auto White Balance 5800K Standard Data Input 2 14. Auto White Balance 5800K Standard Data Input 3 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW Adjust the white balance standard data at 5800K.

Adjust the white balance standard data at 5800K. DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 15. Auto White Balance 5800K Check 1 Order Page Address Data Procedure Mode CAMERA Subject Clear chart Check that the displayed data (Standard picture frame with the (Note 3) satisfied the R ratio zoom lens at WIDE end) specified value. DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 16. Auto White Balance 5800K Check 2 17. Auto White Balance 5800K Check 3 Mode CAMERA Mode CAMERA Subject Clear chart Subject Clear chart (Standard picture frame with the (Standard picture frame with the. DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 18.

Auto White Balance 3200K Check 1 Order Page Address Data Procedure Mode CAMERA Check that the displayed data (Note 3) satisfied the R ratio Subject Clear chart specified value. (Standard picture frame with the. DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 19.

Auto White Balance 3200K Check 2 20. Auto White Balance 3200K Check 3 Mode CAMERA Mode CAMERA Subject Clear chart Subject Clear chart (Standard picture frame with the (Standard picture frame with the.

DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 21. Color Reproduction Adjustment Adjust the color separation matrix coefficient so that proper color reproduction is produced. Mode CAMERA Subject Color bar chart (Standard picture frame with the zoom lens at WIDE end) Measurement Point Video terminal of A/V OUT jack (75 Ω.

DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 22. CCD White Defect Compensation Mode CAMERA Subject Not required Measurement Point Displayed data of page: 6, address: 55 Measuring Instrument Adjusting remote commander Note 1: Check that the data of page: 6, address: 02 is “00”.

DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW Processing after Completing Adjustment: 23. CCD Black Defect Compensation Order Page Address Data Procedure Mode CAMERA Press PAUSE button. Subject Clear chart (Standard picture frame with the zoom lens at WIDE end) Measurement Point. DSC-F717 24.

CCD Linearity Check (Monitoring) Order Page Address Data Procedure Check that CCD output at monitoring keeps being straight even Read displayed data. (Note 1) input is changed. Get average value of Mode CAMERA displayed data of ten times. DSC-F717 Processing after Completing Adjustment: Order Page Address Data Procedure Press PAUSE button.

Release the data setting performed at step 1. (Refer to page 6-14) 6-33. DSC-F717 25. CCD Linearity Check (Caputure) Order Page Address Data Procedure Check that CCD output at caputure keeps being straight even in- Convert D to decimal B/GHi put is changed. Notation, and obtain D ’. B/GHi Mode CAMERA Press PAUSE button.

DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 26. Strobe White Balance Adjustment Order Page Address Data Procedure Adjust the white balance when the strobe light flashed.

Press PAUSE button. Mode CAMERA Check the flashing. Subject Flash adjustment box (Note 3) Check the data changes to Paper which reflection rate is “01”.

DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW RadarW 27. LED Illumination Check Processing after Completing Adjustment: Check a deviation of optical axis between AF illuminator and cam- Order Page Address Data Procedure era image. Press PAUSE button. Mode CAMERA Set data noted down at step 2. DSC-F717 RadarW RadarW RadarW 28. AF Illumination Check Adjusting method: Check a deviation of optical axis between AF illuminator and cam- Order Page Address Data Procedure era image and defocusing of the pattern. Perform “Data setting during Mode CAMERA camera system adjustment”.

DSC-F717 COVER COVER Adjusting connector 1-5. LCD SYSTEM ADJUSTMENTS Most of the measuring points for adjusting the LCD system are Before perform the LCD system adjustments, check that the speci- concentrated in CN305 of the FR-194 board. Fied values of “VIDEO SYSTEM ADJUSTMENTS” are satisfied. DSC-F717 1. LCD Initial Data Input (1) 2. LCD Initial Data Input (2) Mode PLAY Mode PLAY Signal Arbitrary Signal Arbitrary Adjustment Page Adjustment Page Adjustment Address 80 to 8F, A3 Adjustment Address 3A to 3F Adjusting method: Adjusting method: 1) Select page: 0, address: 01, and set data: 01.

DSC-F717 3. VCO Adjustment (PD-179 Board) 4. D Range Adjustment (PD-179 Board) Set the VCO free-run frequency. If deviated, the LCD screen will Set the D Range of the RGB decoder for driving the LCD to the be blurred. Specified value. DSC-F717 5. Contrast Adjustment (PD-179 Board) 6.

V-COM Level Adjustment (PD-179 Board) Set the level of the VIDEO signal for driving the LCD to the speci- Set the common electrode drive signal level of LCD to the speci- fied value. DSC-F717 7. V-COM Adjustment (PD-179 Board) 8.

White Balance Adjustment (PD-179 Board) Set the DC bias of the common electrode drive signal of LCD to Correct the white balance. The specified value. If deviated, the LCD screen color cannot be reproduced. DSC-F717 COVER COVER Adjusting connector 1-6. COLOR ELECTRONIC VIEWFINDER SYSTEM Most of the measuring points for adjusting the viewfinder system ADJUSTMENTS are concentrated in CN305 of the FR-194 board. Before perform the color electronic viewfinder system adjustments, Connect the Measuring Instruments via the CPC-12 jig (J-6082- check that the specified values of “VIDEO SYSTEM ADJUST. DSC-F717 1.

EVF Initial Data Input 2. VCO Adjustment (PD-179 Board) Set the VCO free-run frequency.

If deviated, the EVF screen will Mode PLAY be blurred. Signal Arbitrary Mode PLAY Adjustment Page Signal Arbitrary Adjustment Address 90 to 9D, A2. DSC-F717 3. Bright Adjustment (PD-179 Board) 4. Contrast Adjustment (PD-179 Board) Set the D Range of the RGB decoder for driving the LCD to the Set the level of the VIDEO signal for driving the LCD to the speci- specified value.

DSC-F717 5. White Balance Adjustment (PD-179 Board) Correct the white balance. If deviated, the EVF screen color cannot be reproduced. Mode PLAY Signal Arbitrary Measurement Point Check on EVF screen Measuring Instrument Adjustment Page Adjustment Address 98, 99 Specified Value. DSC-F717 COVER COVER 6-2. SERVICE MODE. Changing the address The address increases when the FF (M) button is pressed, 2-1.

ADJUSTING REMOTE COMMANDER and decreases when the REW (m) button is pressed. There The adjusting remote commander is used for changing the calcu- are altogether 256 addresses, from 00 to FF. DSC-F717 COVER COVER 2-2. DATA PROCESS The calculation of the adjusting remote commander display data (hexadecimal notation) are required for obtaining the adjustment data of some adjustment items. In this case, after converting the hexadecimal notation to decimal notation, calculate and convert the result to hexadecimal notation, and use it as the adjustment data. DSC-F717 COVER COVER 2-3. SERVICE MODE Display on the Bit values 1.

Setting the Test Mode Adjusting bit3 bit2 bit1 bit0 remote Page D Address 21 commander bit7 bit6 bit5 bit4 Data Function Normal Forced MOVIE mode power ON Forced CAMERA mode power ON. DSC-F717 3. Mode Dial Check (1) 6. Switch Check (1) Page 2 Address 90 Page 2 Address 80 Data Function Function When bit value=1 When bit value=0 00 to 14 POWER SW 15 to 3D PLAY (Mode Dial) others PLAY. DSC-F717 7.

Switch Check (2) Page 2 Address 91 to 95 Using method: 1) Select page: 2, addresses: 91 to 95. 2) By discriminating the dispaly data, the pressed key can be discriminated. Data Address 00 to 14 15 to 3D. DSC-F717 AF ILLUMINATION CHECK Take a reduced or enlarged copy on the clear sheet so that a rectangular frame of the SHEET FOR AUXILIARY LIGHT is suitable for the effective image size of the monitor. DSC-F717 FOR CAMERA COLOR REPRODUCTION ADJUSTMENT Take a copy of CAMERA COLOR For NTSC mode REPRODUCTION FRAME with a clear sheet for use. DSC-F717 6-53 E.

Driver

Reverse 992999451.pdf Revision History S.M. Date History Contents issued 2002.09 Official Release — —.