T Vn Mua Fusion For Mac

Posted : admin On 16.06.2019
T Vn Mua Fusion For Mac Average ratng: 9,6/10 128 reviews

Mac Pro is muscle through and through, starting with the Intel Xeon E5, available with 6 or 8 cores of processing power on a single die. And with up to 25MB of L3 cache, 40GB/s of PCI Express gen 3 bandwidth, and 256-bit-wide floating-point instructions, you’ll never be at a loss for speed. Mac has always been built around a singular vision: to create machines that are as powerful and functional as they are beautiful and intuitive. Mac Pro is a stunning realization of that ideal. All the elements that define a pro computer — graphics, storage, expansion, processing power, and memory — have been rethought and reengineered.

A collection of new photos and a video showcase a Lightning to 3.5 mm adapter, which has previously been rumored as a bundled accessory for the iPhone 7 this fall as a way to assuage users of the smartphone's long-rumored removal of the 3.5 mm headphone jack. The adapter in today's photos was reportedly obtained from a Foxconn factory in Vietnam (via Tinhte.vn) Google Translate, and the report's author believes it could be a genuine Apple adapter.As shown in the pictures shared today, the adapter's cord appears short and visually similar to that of Apple's current adapters sold on its website, including the USB-C to USB and Thunderbolt to Gigabit Ethernet accessories. The Lightning plug does not appear to fit particularly well into its sheath, but it's unclear if it might be an incomplete part, damaged during disassembly, or simply a knockoff product. When the Lightning to 3.5 mm adapter is plugged into a device running iOS 9 or lower, the software displays an incompatibility message to the user, but when used on devices with a beta of iOS 10 installed, the dongle appears to work 'immediately' without any issues. The author also notes that if headphones are plugged into both the standard headphone jack on a current iPhone and the adapter connected to Lightning, the device gives priority to the Lightning port for audio output.While the adapter shown today could still potentially be a third-party product, it fits with Apple's design aesthetic and its ability to function with the large number of 3.5 mm headphones already in the wild could be a better. With the official launch of the new ultra-slim 12-inch MacBook with Retina display still over a week away on April 10, Vietnamese site Tinhte.vn has managed to get its hands on the brand-new silver MacBook and has shared an unboxing video and photos.The entirety of the video is in Vietnamese, of course, but is still worth a watch to check out the design of the new MacBook, the USB-C adapter, and the edge-to-edge keyboard in someone's hands outside the confines of Apple's media event last month. Additional photos from the unboxing can be found on the Tinhte.vn official website, with the full video located on the site's YouTube channel.

T Vn Mua Fusion For Mac

The new MacBook launches on April 10, and Apple has yet to announce whether it will be offering pre-orders ahead of that date.Tinhte.vn has a long history of getting its hands on Apple products ahead of their launches, with early looks at such products as the iPhone 4, third-generation iPad, and EarPods. Well-known Vietnamese blog Tinhte.vn today published images that reportedly show the design of Apple's next generation iPad Air 2. The pictured device has the same general form factor as the existing iPad Air, but includes a thinner 7 mm profile that measures roughly the same as the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus and thinner than the current 7.5 mm iPad Air.

In line with previous rumors, the iPad Air 2 model also includes a home button with a Touch ID fingerprint sensor.Claimed iPad Air 2 mockup from Tinhte.vn While this latest report includes detailed photographs and a video, they only give us a hint at Apple's next-generation iPad as the device in the photos is described as a dummy model used by accessory manufacturers to test out and showcase their designs and not an actual iPad Air 2 unit leaked from a Foxconn assembly line. Similar to previous leaks, the iPad model has the same external design features seen in earlier leaks and in MacRumors' own dummy unit on hand since June. Tinhte dummy unit (left) vs. MacRumors dummy unit (right) Of perhaps most note, the Tinhte.vn and other dummy models include two distinctive small holes in the area of the rear camera - one on the back and one of the side of the casing. The hole closest to the camera is undoubtedly for a microphone, while the other hole likely marks the presumed location of the mute/rotation switch, which is not depicted ini full on the models.

Today's report and an earlier one have suggested this hole is for a microphone rather than simply marking the mute/rotation switch location, but we believe this. A series of images of what are claimed to be a prototype lower-cost iPhone 4 have been posted to Vietnamese site Tinhte.vn. The images are said to come from a 'very reliable source' and are said to represent a lower-cost version of the iPhone 4.

Machine translation describes an iPhone 4 but using plastic instead of glass to lower costs: Some other information that you want to transfer to you is that this machine seems to run faster than the iPhone 4, lighter weight and two glass front and back seem to have been replaced by two plastic sheets, type of sensation and cry other than the iPhone 4. Vinhte.vn is notable for being one of the sites with early access to one of the original iPhone 4 prototypes. They've also posted photos and video from an iPod Touch prototype with camera as well as 64 GB White iPhone 4 running a special version of iOS 4 with Expose-like multitasking.There has been speculation about the possibility of two new iPhone models this year, including a cheaper model alongside the iPhone 5. The role of the cheaper model would be to penetrate the mid range smartphone market with another device. The existing iPhone 4 may be too expensive to produce as is to fill this gap.Update: Some have suggested that the device is simply a regular jailbroken iPhone 4 with either matte protection films on the front and back or an early conversion kit utilizing plastic parts to turn black iPhone 4 units into white ones. While either of these explanations may be true, the original poster seems to believe that the device is genuine, and his track record of.

Engadget points to a new video posted on Vietnamese site Tinhte.vn apparently claiming to show a white iPhone 4 running a 'test version' of iOS offering Expose-like multitasking that allows users to select running apps from a grid of nine screenshot thumbnails. You can tap on a window to expand it (replete with animation) to fill the screen or long-press on it to bring up the familiar 'x' button for shutting it down.

For power users who need all the performance they can get, we'd love to see the new hexa-core i9-8950HK as an option for the 15-inch model. With base clock speeds of up to 2.9GHz and a turbo boost clock at a shocking 4.8GHz, this chip should be able cut through Apple's new ProRES RAW codec with ease, even in 4K, while maintaining the same 45-watt thermal design point (TDP). Updated keyboard The 2016 MacBook Pro redesign introduced an updated version of the butterfly keyboard first found in the 12-inch Retina MacBook.

This ultra low-travel keyboard has been a love it or hate it design for many, but one that I personally like. I enjoy the satisfying 'clickiness' the keyboard offers but the extra effort needed to actuate the keys sometimes tire my fingers during long writing sessions. Using older Apple notebooks like the MacBook Air leaves me missing the longer key travel, but not the slightly mushy and wobbly feel from the uneven travel that was fixed in the new design. Recent AppleInsider analysis using data sourced from Apple repair centers suggests the 2016 MacBook Pro butterfly keyboards fail as older models. I think we can all agree that a more reliable third-generation butterfly keyboard with a bit more key travel would be great.

Out with the Touch-Bar Even though the Touch Bar seemed cool and exciting at the time of its launch, now I'd say it's more of a gimmick than a useful tool. I was really open-minded when I unboxed my first Touch Bar-equipped MacBook Pro and I initially used the Touch Bar often enough to warrant its existence. As time went on, though, I resorted to my old habits of just using the trackpad, keyboard, and a mouse instead of Touch Bar shortcuts. When I purchased an LG Ultrafine 5K display and started leaving my MacBook Pro in clamshell mode, my use of the Touch Bar shifted to just the required taps and slides needed to adjust backlight and volume.

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When it came time to upgrade my wife's laptop I opted for the non-Touch Bar model. I spend a lot of time talking other users in creative industries, like photographers, graphics designers and film makers. Whenever I see or hear of someone using a Touch Bar MacBook Pro, I ask if they actually make use of the Touch Bar, but I've never received a single 'yes' in response after over 30 queries. Apple needs to find a way to make the Touch Bar useful by incorporating higher-function controls, additional commands or a larger work area. If it can't capitalize on the hardware, it might be time to rethink its incorporation in the MacBook Pro's design. Face ID, please! After a successful and promising introduction in the iPhone X, I want to see Face ID used in every Apple device I own.

The convenience of not having to enter a password or scan a fingerprint is truly freeing. I can get to the home screen with a simple upwards swipe, with seemingly nothing to slow me down. I don't have to remove gloves if I'm on my motorcycle to unlock with Touch ID (the sensors recognize my face even with my tinted shield closed) with Apple also claiming Face ID is much more secure than its other main biometric authentication system. Moving back to my MacBook Pro after spending time with the XPS 13x made me realize how archaic it is to move a finger over a sensor for authentication purposes. The Dell notebook included a feature called Windows Hello, a facial recognition technology that, while not as advanced as Face ID, proved a worthy competitor.

As soon as I unfold the Dell XPS I'm instantly greeted with my desktop, an experience we think should be in the next MacBook. Along with effortless login, the ability to use keychain for password control and logins like the iPhone X would also make web authentication easy and more secure for most users. Larger, brighter, HDR displays Apple makes point of installing cutting-edge display technology in each MacBook Pro update, keeping the device at the top of the market in terms of color accuracy, contrast and brightness. We hope they keep up that trend.

At 500 nits, the current MacBook Pro has class-leading brightness levels, which makes it usable in bright rooms and outdoors that would defeat other notebook displays. I'd love to see the 2018 MacBook Pro display gain another 100 to 200 nits of brightness matching the latest iPhones and iPad Pros.

This would further reduce glare issues and allow HDR content to displayed and accurately edited. As for color accuracy, bumping up from the just over 100-percent sRGB DCI P3 panel to a 100-percent Adobe RGB version would be fantastic for those working in wider color spaces. Minimizing the bezels by stretching the 13.3-inch and 15.4-inch displays to an even 14 and 16 inches would be great as an extra refinement, so long as it doesn't interfere with the chance of Face ID. RAM increased to 32GB One of the biggest limitations for power users is being stuck with a maximum of 16GB of RAM, the same maximum amount available in the range since 2011.

A lot of MacBook users including myself were disappointed in 2016 when Apple announced the redesigned MacBook Pro would once again cap out at 16GB due to Low Power DDR4 (LPDDR4) memory limitations with Intel's then-current chips. Apple chose to stick with DDR3 in order to use the low power variant, allowing them to maximize battery life for the new thinner and lighter models that have smaller batteries. We all hoped the 2017 refresh would offer 32GB of RAM, but it didn't. Almost a year later, the newly released 8th-generation Intel processors still lack support for LP-DDR4 memory, which Apple wants to use. It has reached a point where I would personally accept a lower battery life in exchange for more RAM. The current battery life is quite short under heavy loads, like during video editing or in graphic design, and these are areas where 32GB of memory would be really beneficial.

Most users search for an electrical outlet to plug into while doing these types of heavy tasks anyway. Additionally, there are now a variety of inexpensive USB-C PD power banks on the market which output the necessary voltage and amps needed to power a 15-inch MacBook Pro during intense on-the-go sessions, making internal battery life less of an issue. Go back to the 2015 design. Put in the latest CPU/chipset. Update the TB2 ports to TB3/USB-C. Maybe use the newer screen technology. Use the full cooling capacity of the 2015 design to keep these new lower power chips nice and cool.

I'll order one tomorrow. It would easily be the best laptop ever made (as Marco said of the 2015, and on which I agree). And, in fact, that would solve pretty much Apple's whole Mac lineup problems. Take the trash-can Mac Pro, update the components.

Take the Mac Mini, update the components. Take the 'cheese-grater' Mac Pro and update the components.

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2019 Mac Pro done right now. Apple has had some insanely great products in the past, but for some reason, they feel the need to re-invent them when there is no need, and make them worse. Sometimes, yes, you have to make an overall design jump. But, most of the time, if it ain't broke.

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Edited May 11. Max probably knows this, but for some reason it got left out of this video/article: 1. The 2017 MBP introduced a modified version of the butterfly keyboard that significantly lowers the risk of damage/service need (according to Mike Wuerthele's article focused on the 2016 MBP), so a 2018 model will probably improve on that further based on further understanding of where the 2016 one caused issues.

T Vn Mua Fusion For Mac

For people who hate low-travel keys, you are not likely to notice much if any change. Apple is not giving up on the butterfly design because it is better in most ways, so get real about this. Speaking of getting real: as Max undoubtedly knows, LP-DDR4 and DDR4 are two completely different types of RAM (think the difference between Java and Javascript for a comparison), and this it is not a case of 'well just make it 0.2mm thicker' to switch to DDR4 - it would require a complete case redesign and would very significantly diminish battery life, so again - na ga ha pen.

You want 32GB of RAM, you're waiting till 2019 at least - and that's not Apple's fault, it's Intel's fault. I was glad to see Max noted that the 8th-gen chips still don't have that support. The touchbar is great. Alleged 'pros' (whatever that means) may not find it all that useful, but 'normal people' (who work with photos, text, use Facebook, that sort of thing) love it, at least in my anecdotal observations of people actually using them in public places. It would be good for some commenters here to bear in mind that they're not really 'typical' Mac users, and that the vast majority of MBP (and Mac generally) buyers are first and foremost iOS users - the touchbar's easy access to emoji, accented characters, Touch ID, and especially predictive text (aka major iOS features) are a major selling point for the 90 percent of buyers who are not editing in FCP or Photoshop all day. Edited May 11. Speaking of getting real: as Max undoubtedly knows, LP-DDR4 and DDR4 are two completely different types of RAM (think the difference between Java and Javascript for a comparison), and this it is not a case of 'well just make it 0.2mm thicker' to switch to DDR4 - it would require a complete case redesign and would very significantly diminish battery life, so again - na ga ha pen.

You want 32GB of RAM, you're waiting till 2019 at least - and that's not Apple's fault, it's Intel's fault. I was glad to see Max noted that the 8th-gen chips still don't have that support. The touchbar is great.

Alleged 'pros' (whatever that means) may not find it all that useful, but 'normal people' (who work with photos, text, use Facebook, that sort of thing) love it, at least in my anecdotal observations of people actually using them in public places. It would be good for some commenters here to bear in mind that they're not really 'typical' Mac users, and that the vast majority of MBP (and Mac generally) buyers are first and foremost iOS users - the touchbar's easy access to emoji, accented characters, Touch ID, and especially predictive text (aka major iOS features) are a major selling point for the 90 percent of buyers who are not editing in FCP or Photoshop all day. Re: - Fair points, but given that this is a pro lineup (or at least supposedly is), wouldn't it make some sense to have one high-end model that goes in that direction? I think that was maybe his point? Re: - So, the pros aren't the typical MacBook Pro users? Yes, that might be the actual problem.

Instead of being for pros, the MacBook Pro has become the MacBook+. The MacBook Pro shouldn't be aimed at the average iOS user. That's what the MacBook and MacBook Air (if they'd update it) are for. Max probably knows this, but for some reason it got left out of this video/article: 1. The 2017 MBP introduced a modified version of the butterfly keyboard that significantly lowers the risk of damage/service need (according to Mike Wuerthele's article focused on the 2016 MBP), so a 2018 model will probably improve on that further based on further understanding of where the 2016 one caused issues.

For people who hate low-travel keys, you are not likely to notice much if any change. Apple is not giving up on the butterfly design because it is better in most ways, so get real about this. A butterfly design that have changed two times since 2015 (could it change again in 2018?), that has quality issues and an awful tactile feedback is no something I'll consider better in most ways, as you said. Max probably knows this, but for some reason it got left out of this video/article: 1. The 2017 MBP introduced a modified version of the butterfly keyboard that significantly lowers the risk of damage/service need (according to Mike Wuerthele's article focused on the 2016 MBP), so a 2018 model will probably improve on that further based on further understanding of where the 2016 one caused issues. For people who hate low-travel keys, you are not likely to notice much if any change. Apple is not giving up on the butterfly design because it is better in most ways, so get real about this.

A butterfly design that have changed two times since 2015 (could it change again in 2018?), that has quality issues and an awful tactile feedback is no something I'll consider better in most ways, as you said. It's a little too delicate also.

Many users who complain about key response in certain keys have ended up having whole topcases replaced because replacing the keys themselves is a very delicate process over the old models and a lot of techs end up tearing the membrane and then replacing the whole topcase. A topcase replacement is a lot harder to do on the newer MacBook Pros compared to the older ones. 'Edit 4K video.'

I love a comment like that, sprouting like a weed in every techie blog site with posers and dilettants who act like professional video editors because they do unpacking videos in Final Cut Pro. 4K is.meaningless. on small screens. You are not going to amaze yourself as you edit anything on a 13 or 15 inch screen. It is, ultimately, a technology that demands to be projected on very, very large screens, and I don't mean 21- or 27-inch monitors.

A professional editor is.not. going to edit trusting a laptop screen for anything.

And this is not a selling point at all because.it is meaningless. Max probably knows this, but for some reason it got left out of this video/article: 1. The 2017 MBP introduced a modified version of the butterfly keyboard that significantly lowers the risk of damage/service need (according to Mike Wuerthele's article focused on the 2016 MBP), so a 2018 model will probably improve on that further based on further understanding of where the 2016 one caused issues. For people who hate low-travel keys, you are not likely to notice much if any change. Apple is not giving up on the butterfly design because it is better in most ways, so get real about this. A butterfly design that have changed two times since 2015 (could it change again in 2018?), that has quality issues and an awful tactile feedback is no something I'll consider better in most ways, as you said.

I have both a 2012 15” MBPr (handed down to the kids) and a 2017 model (the top one with the Radeon 560pro) so I’m in a direct position to compare them. I greatly prefer the 2017 model’s keyboard, it’s crisper and just feels sharper. The 2012 model, while I loved it, feels mushy and soft now by comparison. The Touchbar is far more useful to me than the old function keys ever were. I use it in everything from the Finder to XCode to VMWare Fusion.

While your mileage may vary, I much prefer it to the old keys. And the big touch pad is awesome, a great improvement over an already good touchpad. The improvements I’d like to see is Apple kicking Intel to the kerb and using its own CPU design so that it doesn’t suffer intel’s incompetence any longer.

Apple’s A series have supported LPDDR4 since the A8! I’d also like to see them add haptic feedback to the TouchBar to make it more naturally responsive. And maybe add Pencil support since the touchpad should be big enough to handle it spaciouly.

Overall, I love the new model, but I understand that others don’t. The only negative to me is the reduced battery size. But that’s the trade off that comes with reducing the size and weight, which I love since I carry it around a lot. Apple management have an equation they use, if 80% love a product, 10% neutral and the remaining 10% hate, then they’ll go with the 80. All their comments since the release of the new MBPs in 2016 indicates that’s the case.

No matter how loud and noisy the hate may get. So there’s no turning back. I always hear people talking about 'travel' on the keys, but never any specifics on what the 'travel' difference actually is in terms of a measurement. I truly doubt the actual amount of 'travel' difference between the 2015 and 2016/17 designs amounts to much of anything. I think it's really the reduction of the key wobbling that makes people think there's a difference, but that isn't really 'travel' at all. I also think it's kind of funny that rumor sites that constantly complain about Apple needing more 'pro' hardware or accessories wouldn't like the Touch Bar.

Use of keyboard and F keys for shortcuts is typically considered a very 'pro' type of use, and the Touch Bar just gives the user a lot more possibilities in that area. Edited May 12.