Weekly Show Page 37 For Mac

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Format Pages table cells to display different types of data You can format table cells to display text, numbers, currency, percentages, date and time, and durations denoting a span of time (for example, “3 weeks 4 days 2 hours”). The cell format determines how data in the cell appears and how cell data is recognized by formulas that refer to that cell. You can also choose how many decimal places appear in cells that contain numbers, currency units, or percentage values, even if the exact value entered in the cell is more precise than what you want to show. The actual value entered is always used in calculations, regardless of how many decimal places appear in the cell. When a formula refers to text in a cell, the displayed value is used in the calculation. You can change a cell’s format even if you already typed content in the cell.

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Feb 26, 2016  How to add week numbers in Outlook for mac 2016? Go to preference -> calendar. Check the option show week numbers. Just as the article described, the week number is only available in day and week view but not in mini calendars or month view. Thanks, chris. TMO Weekly Sponsor. Have a tech question? Visit our Mac Geek Gab Q&A Forums and have the tech support brilliance of the entire Mac Geek Gab community at your fingertips! AAPL Stock Price.

For example, if you have a table of prices, you can add a currency symbol (for example, a dollar sign $) to cells by formatting them as currency, then selecting the symbol you want. By default, cells formatted as numbers display as many decimal places as you type in them. You can change this setting so that all cells formatted as numbers display the same number of decimal places. Changes to decimal settings apply to both numbers and percentages. For example, if you change a number in a cell to a percentage, the number of decimal places displayed doesn’t change. you want to format. In the Format, click the Cell tab.

Click the Data Format pop-up menu and choose an option:. Number: Displays standard number formatting. Fraction: Displays numbers with a numerator and a denominator. Choose an option from the Accuracy pop-up menu to specify the maximum number of digits you want displayed, or to round the value to the nearest half, quarter, and so on. Scientific: Displays numbers in scientific notation.

In the Decimals field, type the number of decimal places you want displayed, or choose Auto to display as many decimal places as you type. You can adjust the number formatting in the following ways:. Set the number of decimal places: In the Decimals field, type the number of decimal places you want to display.

Pages rounds the display value instead of truncating the display value. For example, if the value in the cell is “5.75” and you set the number of decimal places for the cell to zero, Pages displays “6.”. Display as many decimal places as you type in each cell: Delete the number in the Decimals field, or click the Decimals down arrow until you reach the Auto setting.

Specify how negative values appear: Click the pop-up menu to the right of the Decimals field and choose an option. Show the thousands separator: Select the Thousands Separator checkbox. By default, cells formatted as currency display two decimal places. You can change this setting so that cells display as many decimal places as you type in them, or so that all cells display the same number of decimal places.

you want to format. In the Format, click the Cell tab. Click the Data Format pop-up menu, then choose Currency. Do any of the following:. Set the number of decimal places: In the Decimals field, type the number of decimal places you want to display.

Pages rounds the display value instead of truncating the display value. For example, if the value in the cell is “5.75” and you set the number of decimal places for the cell to zero, Pages displays “6.”. Display as many decimal places as you type in each cell: Delete the number in the Decimals field, or click the Decimals down arrow until you reach the Auto setting. Specify how negative values appear: Click the pop-up menu to the right of the Decimals field and choose an option. Show the thousands separator: Select the Thousands Separator checkbox. Use accounting-style negative numbers: Select the Accounting Style checkbox to display negative values within parentheses.

Click the Currency pop-up menu, then choose a currency symbol, such as US Dollar ($). By default, cells formatted as percentages display as many decimal places as you type in them. You can change this setting so that all cells display the same number of decimal places. Changes to decimal settings apply to both percentages and numbers in a selected range of cells.

For example, if you change the format of a cell from a percentage to a decimal, the number of decimal places displayed doesn’t change. you want to format. In the Format, click the Cell tab. Click the Data Format pop-up menu, then choose Percentage.

Do any of the following:. Set the number of decimal places: In the Decimals field, type the number of decimal places you want to display. Pages rounds the display value instead of truncating the display value. For example, if the value in the cell is “5.75” and you set the number of decimal places for the cell to zero, Pages displays “6.”. Display as many decimal places as you type in each cell: Delete the number in the Decimals field, or click the Decimals down arrow until you reach the Auto setting. Specify how negative values appear: Click the pop-up menu to the right of the Decimals field and choose an option. Show the thousands separator: Select the Thousands Separator checkbox.

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If you format a cell that already contains a value, the value is assumed to be a decimal and is converted to a percentage. For example, 3 becomes 300%. If a percentage value is used in a formula, its decimal number version is used. For example, a value that appears as 3% is used as 0.03 in a formula.

or range of cells you want to format. In the Format, click the Cell tab. Click the Data Format pop-up menu, then choose Date & Time. Click the Date pop-up menu, then choose a format.

If you choose None, no date is displayed in the cell, even if a date is entered and used in date and time calculations. Click the Time pop-up menu, then choose a format.

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If you choose None, no time is displayed in the cell, even if a time is entered and used in date and time calculations. If you don’t enter both a date and a time, Pages adds a default value for you. For example, if you type “1:15 PM,” Pages adds today’s date by default. By default, cells containing duration data are automatically formatted to display all the time units you enter. You can change this setting so that duration cells display only certain units of time (for example, only hours, not minutes, seconds, or milliseconds), even though more precise duration values have been entered in the cell and are used in formulas that make calculations based on units of time. or range of cells you want to format.

In the Format, click the Cell tab. Click the Data Format pop-up menu, then choose Duration.

Do one of the following:. Show or hide time unit labels: Click Automatic Units, then click the Style pop-up menu and choose an option:. 0: Hides all time unit labels.

0w: Displays time unit labels as abbreviations—for example, “m” for minutes. 0 weeks: Displays time unit labels fully spelled out.

Make all duration cells display the same units: Click Custom Units, then click units on the right or left end of the duration range selector to encompass the scope of the time duration you want to use, from weeks (wk) to milliseconds (ms). If you change the duration format after you enter data in the cells, the data automatically adjusts to the new duration format you set.

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The MAC 31 series is a direct solenoid operated 3-way - 6mm - poppet valve. A direct operated 3-way of this size with such high flow is unique to MAC due to patented design innovations. It features an oval armature in the solenoid, a balanced poppet and powerful return spring. These features translate into high shifting forces, fast consistent response times, high flow in a small package and long life. For information regarding certifications (such as UL, CSA, RoHS, and CE) please visit the pages on our website. The MAC 35L Series is a direct solenoid operated 3-way poppet valve featuring our Bullet Valve™ technology (patents pending). The Bullet Valve™ design is a unique hybrid technology that utilizes a 'lifting' solenoid (denoted by the 'L' in 35L) with an integrated armature/balanced poppet.

The solenoid configuration features fewer parts and fewer wear points than our standard 35 series solenoid. Our lifting solenoid design is isolated from airline contaminants and our signature balanced design means consistent shifting forces and repeatable response times regardless of inlet pressure fluctuations. The MAC 32 Series is high flow 10mm 3-way solenoid pilot operated spool valve with a unique integral four way pilot. The short stroke solenoid utilizes an oval armature for maximized shifting forces in a small area. The 4-way pilot means a low minimum operating pressure - no pistons - and minimal resistance to shifting. The balanced design in the pilot means shifting forces are consistently high and response times are repeatable regardless of inlet pressure fluctuations. For information regarding certifications (such as UL, CSA, RoHS and CE) please visit the pages on our website.

The Mac 34 series is a direct solenoid operated 3-way - 10mm - poppet valve. A direct operated 3-way of this size with such high flow is unique to MAC due to patented design innovations. It features an oval armature in the solenoid, a balanced poppet and powerful return spring. These features translate into high shifting forces, fast consistent response times, high flow in a small package and long life. For information regarding certifications (such as UL, CSA, RoHS, and CE) please visit the pages on our website. The MAC 77 Series valve is a 3-way balanced P.O.P. (Pilot Operated Poppet) valve pilot operated by a small direct operated 4-way solenoid valve - a one-off in air valve manufacturing.

The 4-way pilot means a low minimum operating pressure - no pistons - and minimal resistance to shifting. The balanced design in the pilot means shifting forces are consistently high and response times are repeatable regardless of inlet pressure fluctuations. For information regarding certifications (such as UL, CSA, RoHS and CE) please visit the pages on our website. The MAC 38 Series is a high flow 16mm 3-way spool valve with a unique integral four way pilot. The short stroke solenoid utilizes an oval armature for maximized shifting forces in a small area. The 4-way pilot means a low minimum operating pressure - no pistons - and minimal resistance to shifting. The balanced design in the pilot means shifting forces are consistently high and response times are repeatable regardless of inlet pressure fluctuations.

For information regarding certifications (such as UL, CSA, RoHS and CE) please visit the pages on our website. The MAC 100 Series is a direct solenoid operated 3-way poppet valve. It features a short stroke solenoid, a balanced poppet and powerful return spring. These features translate into high shifting forces, fast consistent response times, and long life. Our unique balanced design means versatility in piping - the valve can be configured as a 3-way or 2-way - normally closed or normally open or can be used for vacuum, diverter, or selector applications. For information regarding certifications (such as UL, CSA, RoHS, and CE) please visit the pages on our website. The MAC 1100 Series is a versatile 3-way mechanically operated valve.

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This series features a wide variety of manual operator options, from levers and push-buttons to cams and remote air operated versions. Our unique balanced design means versitility in piping - the valve can be configured as a 3-way or 2-way - normally closed or normally open or can be used for vacuum, diverter, or selector applications.

For information regarding certifications (such as UL, CSA, RoHS and CE) please visit the pages on our website. This new valve series utilizes the patented balanced lifting technology that was developed for the Bullet Valve®, and has been implemented in the 35 Series lifting and 46 Series lifting valves. By reconfiguring the standard 36 Series push type solenoid construction to a lifting design while maintaining the balanced principles of MAC Valves, we have added the benefits of longer life and greater repeatability without sacrificing the technology that has made the 36 Series a market leader. For information regarding certifications (such as UL, CSA, RoHS, and CE) please visit the pages on our website. The MAC 72 Series valve is a 3-way balanced P.O.P. (Pilot Operated Poppet) valve - pilot operated by our Bullet Valve® technology - patents pending. The Bullet Valve® utilizes 'lifting' solenoid technology.

The MAC 'lifting' configuration is unique, however, in that the valve maintains a balanced design - a signature feature of a MAC valve - as shifting forces are consistently high and response times are repeatable regardless of inlet pressure fluctuations. For information regarding certifications (such as UL, CSA, RoHS and CE) please visit the pages on our website.