Why Can't We Have Directory Services Like Open Directory (for Mac

Posted : admin On 11.11.2019
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The only 'Back Office' integration I'm aware of with a Windows Environment is the integration with specific MS products. Granted, there are some that are non-MS, and integrate okay.

  1. Why Can't We Have Directory Services Like Open Directory (for Mac Download
  2. Why Can't We Have Directory Services Like Open Directory (for Mac Free

But if you look at Exchange as an example; the integration is that the user in AD can be associated with a Mailbox on Exchange. They'll also authenticate to the network/Exchange with said account. But the same can be said for non AD environments, and using OSX, or any other LDAP network. A good example of that is Novell, and their LDAP and GroupWise. Or a Linux LDAP deployment, and say an Opensource Mail product. I think the biggest reason for AD is that they have the market share at the moment. More businesses use AD vs.

When discussing Open Directory, however, the phrase typically refers to its function as Mac OS X’s native directory service. NetInfo—The local Open Directory domain. Each Mac OS X computer.

That doesn't mean it's better, just that there's more out there, and more to support it. I happen to think the integration of OSX LDAP and Linux is FAR superior to AD, personally.

I support AD, and it's far too complex, and doesn't need to be. The tools for all their products are also fragmented greatly.

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Especially with Exchange 2007, and some of the newer BO products, and Windows 2003. Upgrading to the next version of Windows Server 2008 required updating SHCEMA objects, etc. Where as OpenLDAP you upgrade, and move on. Everything stays as it should. Click to expand.Agree. I would love it if the Windows Server systems I work with were more like OSX, and while I happily use my macbook to fix network issues, the fact remains that server deployments of 1000+ macs are extremely rare.

I know of Apple itself, and a few universities, and that's it. I'm sure there's a few more but not many. Wheras with Windows and the various UNIX flavours, enterprise / multi-national level deployments are extremely common, so the code's been tested a lot, there's many experts, gurus, consultancies and guides out there, the code's battle tested (irrespective of whether it's actually any good or not).

I'd probably go for OSX server for a small company, just to see what it was like, and I'm sure it'd work well but I don't know about larger companies. At my school, we actually use both. We have all of our staff computers, and student computers on a Windows/AD network, and we are talking about 1300+ PCs, and 8 Servers. We also have a Mac lab, with 50 iMac's, and 3 OS X Servers. Of course our Windows network handles all the DNS/DHCP services for all computers connected to our network, PC's and Mac's. Our Mac servers handle all the login and file sharing for all the Mac's on campus. Working in a mixed mode network has it's problems, but for the 4+ years we have had our Mac lab up and running, we have had little problems.

I guess the thing to do is find out what works for you. Some people are just die-hard Windows for AD, and some are not. Click to expand.Nah, I have 1,200 Macs on two campuses, 25 PC's and 27 XServes using Open Directory and 4 PC servers. The only issues I have at ALL are some HP POE-AP units making logins slow (but that's solved now). Also, most every school in this area are Mac but for one or two districts. One went with Citrix so you know that there isn't a whole lot of creative work going on there. South of me there's one with 1,000, and my hometown district has about 1,000 total.

Heck, it's a no-brainer. TCO analysis from a capable brain demands Macs. I had an AD server for 25 PC's and it took more time and resources to tweak that than the Mac setup combined. As for 'Windows offers more back-office and enterprise level applications / functions / utilities than OSX' I can't totally disagree with that.

What I DID see was 1,219,990 different settings that could be done on the WIN box, of which any normal person might use a few dozen. I'm not in this to impress with my director skills. We need computers to work, work all the time, remain secure, and not impede creativity.

And that's exactly what AD doesn't do. That AD box now serves up Anti-Virus Enterprise for my handful of HP desktops.

The only 'Back Office' integration I'm aware of with a Windows Environment is the integration with specific MS products. Granted, there are some that are non-MS, and integrate okay. But if you look at Exchange as an example; the integration is that the user in AD can be associated with a Mailbox on Exchange. They'll also authenticate to the network/Exchange with said account. But the same can be said for non AD environments, and using OSX, or any other LDAP network.

A good example of that is Novell, and their LDAP and GroupWise. Or a Linux LDAP deployment, and say an Opensource Mail product. I think the biggest reason for AD is that they have the market share at the moment. More businesses use AD vs. That doesn't mean it's better, just that there's more out there, and more to support it. I happen to think the integration of OSX LDAP and Linux is FAR superior to AD, personally. I support AD, and it's far too complex, and doesn't need to be.

The tools for all their products are also fragmented greatly. Especially with Exchange 2007, and some of the newer BO products, and Windows 2003. Upgrading to the next version of Windows Server 2008 required updating SHCEMA objects, etc.

Where as OpenLDAP you upgrade, and move on. Everything stays as it should. Nah, I have 1,200 Macs on two campuses, 25 PC's and 27 XServes using Open Directory and 4 PC servers. The only issues I have at ALL are some HP POE-AP units making logins slow (but that's solved now). Also, most every school in this area are Mac but for one or two districts. One went with Citrix so you know that there isn't a whole lot of creative work going on there.

South of me there's one with 1,000, and my hometown district has about 1,000 total. Heck, it's a no-brainer. TCO analysis from a capable brain demands Macs.

I had an AD server for 25 PC's and it took more time and resources to tweak that than the Mac setup combined. As for 'Windows offers more back-office and enterprise level applications / functions / utilities than OSX' I can't totally disagree with that.

What I DID see was 1,219,990 different settings that could be done on the WIN box, of which any normal person might use a few dozen. I'm not in this to impress with my director skills. We need computers to work, work all the time, remain secure, and not impede creativity. And that's exactly what AD doesn't do. That AD box now serves up Anti-Virus Enterprise for my handful of HP desktops. Click to expand. I can agree to that.

There was some time spent learning the GUI and truth be told I am no AD expert! But one HAS to admit it's perhaps the least intuitive interface in history. Here's one example, and please tell me if I missed something: On OD if I want to have an icon on the desktop, a link to a server on the Dock or an application icon placed somewhere else, it was literally one mouse click to accomplish this. On AD there is no one-click solution? To me its the TIME. I have little, and I hate bloat-ware.

I can agree to that. There was some time spent learning the GUI and truth be told I am no AD expert! But one HAS to admit it's perhaps the least intuitive interface in history.

Here's one example, and please tell me if I missed something: On OD if I want to have an icon on the desktop, a link to a server on the Dock or an application icon placed somewhere else, it was literally one mouse click to accomplish this. On AD there is no one-click solution? To me its the TIME. I have little, and I hate bloat-ware.

Click to expand.Hmmm. And how many mouse clicks did it take you to get to the 'one mouse click' in OD? This is the familiarity issue right here isn't it? You have to authenticate to OD, open the group of machines or users whos dock preferences you want to tweak - bit more than one click methinks. Having said that. AD isn't the easiest thing in the world to get to grips with.

Why Can't We Have Directory Services Like Open Directory (for Mac Download

I think its far more powerful than OD but it is also considerably more work. To install an app, for example, you just publish its installer to the machines or users you want to have it, and it will take care of placing the shortcuts as part of the install. Not exactly one click. But not really that difficult once you know AD. I think in both cases you have to understand the philosophy of the product as well as having knowledge of the interface before you can even hope to make sense of what is going on. I've seen a lot of Windows admins come unstuck on a Mac (and a few going the other way), not because they can't understand the interface (we can all read & use help/google, right?) but because they don't take the time to understand the underlying approach behind the tool.

I think knowing both makes you a better sysadmin too (Which is why I made the effort to learn about Apple stuff coming from a Microsoft background as I did). On the server part of my ACSA courses I was talking to the instructor about something he thought was a big problem with OD, and which I hadn't realised was a problem at all because the solution had been carefully documented and planned and I had carried it out dozens of times when the exact same issue occurred in windows AD & NT4 domains.

I honestly thought he was going to break down and cry when I explained the solution and how easy it was.

URL: LDAP false error When the Directory Server (LDAP) information is configured correctly in the account settings, the functionality is enabled for directory lookups, but Outlook will repeatedly display an error code 17768. We have contacted Microsoft about this and unfortunately they do not have any working solution. Workaround: Outlook 2011 SP1 (With autodiscover record in place) will download an offline address book. It will be listed as ACCOUNTNAME Directory. This is a 24-hour old copy of the global address list. Once in place you can delete the directory service settings. Which will prevent the error from popping up again.

Why Can't We Have Directory Services Like Open Directory (for Mac Free

This will also prevent direct GAL lookups. Outlook prompts you for password after the computer wakes up after sleep With Outlook open, use Finder to select the Applications folder, then the MSOffice folder, then holding the Control key down select the Outlook 'O' icon, and select Get Info from the list. Within the Get Info screen presented, check the Prevent Nap App box. 14.3.2 update Sent messages are being filtered If you are experiencing this issue, upgrade to.

Server-side rules cannot be created The only server-side rules that Outlook for Mac currently supports is Out of Office. It does not support setting server-side rules to move or manage messages and contacts or to act on calendar events. That means that all rules created in Outlook 2011 will be applied only when Outlook 2011 is running. Note: starting with Outlook v.14.3.5, server-side rules are supported for Exchange Server 2010 SP1 and higher. Saved search query in Entourage 2008, Web Services Edition converts to a subfolder in Outlook for Mac 2011 In Entourage 2008, Web Services Edition, after you create a search criterion that produces the result that you want, you can save this search to create a dynamically updated view of your Entourage items. However, when you import a saved search criterion from Entourage 2008, Web Services Edition into Outlook for Mac 2011, it is converted to a subfolder in your new Inbox.

Exchange accounts are excluded when importing accounts from Mail.app into Outlook for Mac Exchange accounts are not included when you import data from Mail.app into Outlook for Mac. To use your Exchange account, set up the account in Outlook for Mac. Outlook for Mac does not support “direct booking” as does Outlook for Windows Direct booking is a MAPI-only feature and Outlook for Mac uses Exchange Web Services.

However, you can use Resource mailbox the same way as in Outlook for Windows. See the article. Outlook for Mac does not support a way to replace signatures Outlook for Mac does not support a way to replace a signature with another signature in the e-mail message automatically. When you add a new signature in an attempt to replace an old one, Outlook for Mac appends the new signature instead of replacing it. To replace the signature, you must delete the original signature from the e-mail message manually. Calendar Sharing Within Outlook 2011 for Mac Outlook 2011/2016 users must be granted 'Reviewer' access to another person's calendar to be able open that calendar and view details. If a user sets permission levels only to allow free/busy or free/busy limited details, an Outlook 2011 user will not be able to see any details of the shared calendar.

PC users must grant 'full details' to the Outlook 2011 user. Mac users must grant the 'Reviewer' role to Outlook 2011 users. Basic free/busy time viewing is only viewable via the Outlook 2011 Scheduling Assistant feature, or via OWA. (Note: Outlook 2011 users who have a 'Reviewer' role may also be able to select another users name within the Send As / From drop down menu. Unless you have explicit permissions to Create Items within the selected users mailbox, Exchange will not allow you to send on the behalf of that person).

You can find some more information about Outlook 2011 sharing issues. Third-party applications that index content can decrease performance in Outlook for Mac Third-party applications, such as Virex and LaunchBar, that index content on your hard disk may not recognize the new Outlook for Mac database. This can decrease performance in Outlook for Mac. To resolve this issue, if the third-party allows the exclusion of certain directories, then include the Users/ username/Documents/Microsoft User Data/Office 2011 Identities folder in the exclusion list.

Outlook for Mac does not synchronize with the Exchange Server mailbox master category list Actions such as renaming a category might result in extraneous categories in other Exchange clients, such as Outlook for Windows and Outlook Web App. To resolve this issue, delete unwanted categories.

Mail, calendar events, contacts, tasks, and notes with categories created in Outlook for Mac synchronize with Outlook for Windows but might not keep their colors At this time, while category names will synchronize, category colors do not sync. This applies to a user's primary calendar as well as delegated calendars. Categories assigned to shared items are only for the benefit of the user who assigns them If a user assigns a category to a shared item in a public folder or in a shared folder they will only be viewable on that one machine. Categories assigned to shared items do not sync to the Exchange server and will not be available for the same account on other computers nor will they be available to other users. Contact photos do not sync with Outlook for Windows Contact photos created in Outlook for Mac are not displayed after you synchronize Outlook for Mac with Outlook for Windows. Recurring task dates may shift to other dates when viewed in different time zones Recurring task dates may shift unexpectedly when moved across time zone boundaries.

You cannot run certain workflows. The following workflows included with Office for Mac do not work:. In Excel, Import text file and create a table. In Word, Send a PDF version in an Outlook message.

In Outlook, Send image attachments to iPhoto. Notes do not display attachments in Outlook 2011 for Mac If you move a mail message with the attachment to Notes folder, you will be not able to view it. Calendar Side by Side View not available Microsoft had removed the Side by Side feature for viewing calendar with update 14.2 for Outlook 2011. The Calendar can be viewed in Overlay mode if you open more than one Calendar.

Downloading Attachments infinite loop Outlook 2011 downloads all attachments in Inbox folder in batches of 20, and if you let it be, the process will eventually be finished. Although it may start over again, as Inbox is synchronized with the server more often than any other folder in Outlook 2011. Take the following steps to fix the issue:. Mark all messages with attachments in Inbox as read and clear Folder Cache (Right-click the folder Properties Empty Folder Cache), then start downloading items again. Inbox should contain as few items as possible, 3000-4000 is the recommended maximum for Outlook 2011. Sort the items by attachment size and move them into separate folders.

Refer to for more information. Move subfolders up so they are on the same level as Inbox, Sent Items, etc. If the issue persists after taking the steps above. Outlook 2011 cannot connect to a POP/IMAP mailbox A recent security update included disabling SSLv3, and this causes connection issues between Outlook 2011 and AD Postfix servers where POP/IMAP mailboxes are hosted. The issue doesn't affect Outlook 2016.

Contact Groups cannot be synced Contact groups created in Outlook 2011/2016 for Mac are stored locally and can not be synchronized with the Exchange Server. Contract groups created in OWA also can not be synchronized with Outlook 2011/2016 for Mac. Appointments are shown in the UTC time zone (Exchange 2010 only) Accodring to Microsoft, the issue can be fixed only by upgrading to a later Exchange version. A fix isn't available for Exchange 2010. Cannot send Calendar Invitations on behalf of Public folder in Outlook 2016 for Mac Outlook 2016 for Mac does not support allowing subscribed Public Folder users to send on behalf of that Public Folder calendar. Users can send meeting invitations from their own Exchange account and can include that Public Folder as a recipient.