Wireless Network Security: A Place For Mac

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Each piece of hardware connected to a network has a media access control (MAC) address. You can restrict access to your network by filtering these MAC addresses. Consult your user documentation for specific information about enabling these features. You can also utilize the “guest” account, which is a widely used feature on many wireless routers. Next, to make sure your wireless router security is aware of all the other wireless devices which will be connected to your home network and write down their MAC addresses until a complete list of all the devices which will be allowed to connect to your wireless network is obtained.

Just as CSMA/CD is needed for half-duplex Ethernet connections, CSMA/CA is needed for WLAN connections because of their half-duplex operation. Similar to how an Ethernet device listens to an Ethernet segment to determine whether a frame exists on the segment, a WLAN device listens for a transmission on a wireless channel to determine whether it is safe to transmit. In addition, the collision-avoidance part of the CSMA/CA algorithm causes wireless devices to wait for a random backoff time before transmitting. Direct-sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) Modulates data over an entire range of frequencies using a series of symbols called chips.

Wireless Network Security: A Place For Mac

A chip is shorter in duration than a bit, meaning that chips are transmitted at a higher rate than the actual data. These chips not only represent encoded data to be transmitted, but also what appears to be random data. Because both parties involved in a DSSS communication know which chips represent actual data and which chips do not, if a third-party intercepted a DSSS transmission, it would be difficult for that party to eavesdrop on the data because he would not easily know which chips represented valid bits. DSSS is more subject to environmental factors, as opposed to FHSS and OFDM, because it uses an entire frequency spectrum. Explanation: Answers C and D are correct. As a security measure, Keith will secure the wireless network by taking these steps: Configure WPA encryption. Configure MAC filtering.

Wireless Mac Address

WPA encryption is stronger than WEP encryption. WEP encryption is the least secure encryption and is easy to break. By configuring MAC filtering, you will limit the number of devices that can connect to your wireless network. Answer B is incorrect because enabling SSID broadcast will make the network less secure. Answer A is incorrect because changing channel configuration will have no effect on wireless network security. Q: You work as a technician for Mac.hill Inc.

Rick, a sales manager, has a laptop that is compatible with 802.11b and 802.11g wireless networks. He complains that whenever he connects to his home network wirelessly, he gets the maximum connectivity speed of 11Mbps. However, when he connects his computer to the office wireless network, he gets much better connectivity speed. Which of the following steps will you take to resolve the issue? Replace his home network router with one that is 802.11g compatible. Replace his home network router with one that is 802.11b compatible. Replace his network card that supports only 802.11b network.

Replace his network card that supports only 802.11g network. Explanation: Answer option A is correct. According to the scenario, Rick's laptop is compatible with both 802.11b and 802.11g wireless networks. Furthermore, he doesn't get the connectivity speed better than 11Mbps at home network. The most likely cause of the issue is that his home wireless router is compatible to 802.11b standard only. In order to resolve the issue, change Rick's home router with one that is 802.11g compatible. Answer options D and C are incorrect because the scenario specifies that Rick is getting better speed at the office network.

Wireless

This indicates that the network card is working perfectly and does not require any replacement. Answer option B is incorrect because the wireless 802.11b standard provides the maximum transmission speed of 11Mbps. Q: You work as a technician for Mac.hill Inc. Rick, a sales manager, has a laptop that is compatible with 802.11b and 802.11g wireless networks. He complains that whenever he connects to his home network wirelessly, he gets the maximum connectivity speed of 11Mbps. However, when he connects his computer to the office wireless network, he gets much better connectivity speed. Which of the following steps will you take to resolve the issue?

Replace his network card that supports only 802.11g network. Replace his home network router with one that is 802.11g compatible.

Replace his home network router with one that is 802.11b compatible. Replace his network card that supports only 802.11b network.

Explanation: Answer option B is correct. According to the scenario, Rick's laptop is compatible with both 802.11b and 802.11g wireless networks. Furthermore, he doesn't get the connectivity speed better than 11Mbps at home network. The most likely cause of the issue is that his home wireless router is compatible to 802.11b standard only. In order to resolve the issue, change Rick's home router with one that is 802.11g compatible. Answer options A and D are incorrect because the scenario specifies that Rick is getting better speed at the office network.

This indicates that the network card is working perfectly and does not require any replacement. Answer option C is incorrect because the wireless 802.11b standard provides the maximum transmission speed of 11Mbps.

Explanation: Answer option B is correct. Adam will install an omnidirectional antenna to share his Internet connection to his surrounding neighbors. An omnidirectional antenna radiates patterns or signals in all directions. This will provide his neighbors to access his wireless access point. Through WAP, they'll be able to access his Internet connection. Answer option A is incorrect because a directional antenna will radiate signals in a single direction. Answer options C and D are incorrect because a router and a bridge device will not help until they also act as WAP.

As this is not specifically specified in the scenario hence these will not be the best choice. Explanation: Answers B and C are correct. As a security measure, Keith will secure the wireless network by taking these steps:.Configure WPA encryption.Configure MAC filtering. WPA encryption is stronger than WEP encryption. WEP encryption is the least secure encryption and is easy to break. By configuring MAC filtering, you will limit the number of devices that can connect to your wireless network. Answer A is incorrect because enabling SSID broadcast will make the network less secure.

Answer D is incorrect because changing channel configuration will have no effect on wireless network security. Explanation: Answer option A is correct. The 802.1X standard, defined by IEEE, is designed to enhance the security of wireless local area networks (WLANs) that follows the IEEE 802.11 standard. 802.1X provides an authentication framework for wireless LANs. It allows a user to be authenticated by a central authority. When a user requests access to an access point, the access point changes the user's status to an unauthorized state.

It allows the client to send only an EAP start message. The access point returns an EAP message requesting for the user's identity. The client returns the identity, which is then forwarded by the access point to the authentication server. The authentication server uses an algorithm (multiple algorithms are possible) to authenticate the user and then returns accept or reject message to the access point. If the access point receives an accept message, it changes the user's status to the authorized state, which allows normal traffic to take place.

In case of rejection, the client is disallowed to access the network. Answer option B is incorrect because 802.2 specification is commonly referred to as the LLC or Logical Link Control specification. Answer option C is incorrect because 802.3 specification defines the standards for Ethernet. It provides asynchronous networking using CSMA/CD (carrier sense, multiple access with collision detect) over coaxial, twisted-pair copper, and fiber media.

Answer option D is incorrect because 802.5 specification defines a token-passing standard for twisted-pair, shielded copper cables. Explanation: Answer option A is correct. To mitigate the risk, you need to disable the broadcasting of SSID, as it will prevent war driving tools from detecting your network and improves network security. Answer options A and B are incorrect because encryption is an important step in preventing someone from hacking into your wireless network, but it will not prevent them from detecting it. So WPA and WEP encryptions are useless in this case.

Answer option C is incorrect because MAC filtering can keep unauthorized computers from logging onto your network, but it will not make your network undetectable. Explanation: Answer C is correct. To prevent his wireless access point from being accessed by intruders, Jack will implement Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) on the network. WEP secures the network using two components: authentication and encryption.

WEP encrypts data on a wireless network by using a fixed secret key. Answer A is incorrect. Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) is an application layer protocol used to transmit private documents via the Internet. Answer B is incorrect. Auditing is used to track user accounts for file and object access, logon attempts, system shutdown, and so on.

Answer D is incorrect. Internet Protocol Security (IPSec) is a standard-based protocol that provides the highest level of VPN security. Explanation: Answer option C is correct. A malicious user could set up their own access point to which legitimate users would connect. Such an AP is called a rogue access point. That malicious user could then use a packet sniffer to eavesdrop on communication flowing through their access point.

To cause unsuspecting users to connect to the rogue access point, the malicious user could configure the rogue access point with the same Service Set Identifier (SSID) used by a legitimate AP. When a rogue access point is configured with the SSID of legitimate AP, the rogue access point is commonly referred to as an 'evil twin.' Once an open WLAN (or a WLAN whose SSID and authentication credentials are known) is found in a public place, a user might write a symbol on a wall (or some other nearby structure), letting others know the characteristics of the discovered network. This practice, which is a variant of the decades-old practice of hobos leaving symbols as messages to fellow hobos, is called 'warchalking.'

Various security standards are available for encrypting and authenticating a WLAN client with an AP. Two of the less secure standards include Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) and Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA). While WPA is considered more secure than WEP, utilities are available on the Internet for cracking each of these approaches to wireless security. By collecting enough packets transmitted by a secure AP, these cracking utilities can use mathematical algorithms to determine the pre-shared key (PSK) configured on a wireless AP, with which an associating wireless client must also be configured. In the days when dial-up modems were popular, malicious users could run a program on their computer to call all phone numbers in a certain number range.

Phone numbers that answered with modem tone then became potential targets for later attacks. This type of reconnaissance was known as 'war dialing.' A modern day variant of war dialing is 'war driving,' where malicious users drive around looking for unsecured WLANs.

Explanation: Answer option A is correct. In the days when dial-up modems were popular, malicious users could run a program on their computer to call all phone numbers in a certain number range. Phone numbers that answered with modem tone then became potential targets for later attacks.

This type of reconnaissance was known as 'war dialing.' A modern day variant of war dialing is 'war driving,' where malicious users drive around looking for unsecured WLANs. Once an open WLAN (or a WLAN whose SSID and authentication credentials are known) is found in a public place, a user might write a symbol on a wall (or some other nearby structure), letting others know the characteristics of the discovered network. This practice, which is a variant of the decades-old practice of hobos leaving symbols as messages to fellow hobos, is called 'warchalking.' Various security standards are available for encrypting WLAN traffic and authenticating a WLAN client with an AP. Two of the less secure standards include Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) and Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA).

While WPA is considered more secure than WEP, utilities are available on the Internet for cracking each of these approaches to wireless security. By collecting enough packets transmitted by a secure AP, these cracking utilities can use mathematical algorithms to determine the pre-shared key (PSK) configured on a wireless AP, with which an associating wireless client must also be configured. A malicious user could set up their own access point (AP) to which legitimate users could connect. Such an AP is called a rogue access point. That malicious user could then use a packet sniffer to eavesdrop on communication flowing through their access point.

To cause unsuspecting users to connect to the rogue access point, the malicious user could configure the rogue access point with the same Service Set Identifier (SSID) used by a legitimate AP. When a rogue access point is configured with the SSID of a legitimate AP, the rogue access point is commonly referred to as an 'evil twin.'

. SecTools.Org: Top 125 Network Security Tools For more than a decade, the has been cataloguing the network security community's favorite tools. In 2011 this site became much more dynamic, offering ratings, reviews, searching, sorting, and a. This site allows open source and commercial tools on any platform, except those tools that we maintain (such as the, and ). We're very impressed by the collective smarts of the security community and we highly recommend reading the whole list and investigating any tools you are unfamiliar with. Click any tool name for more details on that particular application, including the chance to read (and write) reviews.

Many site elements are explained by tool tips if you hover your mouse over them. Aircrack is a suite of tools for 802.11a/b/g WEP and WPA cracking. It implements the best known cracking algorithms to recover wireless keys once enough encrypted packets have been gathered. The suite comprises over a dozen discrete tools, including airodump (an 802.11 packet capture program), aireplay (an 802.11 packet injection program), aircrack (static WEP and WPA-PSK cracking), and airdecap (decrypts WEP/WPA capture files). Latest release: version 1.1 on April 24, 2010 (8 years, 7 months ago).

Mac Wireless Settings

(#11, 4). Kismet is a console (ncurses) based 802.11 layer-2 wireless network detector, sniffer, and intrusion detection system. It identifies networks by passively sniffing (as opposed to more active tools such as ), and can even decloak hidden (non-beaconing) networks if they are in use. It can automatically detect network IP blocks by sniffing TCP, UDP, ARP, and DHCP packets, log traffic in / compatible format, and even plot detected networks and estimated ranges on downloaded maps. As you might expect, this tool is commonly used for. Oh, and also, and, etc. Latest release: version Kismet-2013-03-R1b on April 8, 2013 (5 years, 8 months ago).

Mac Network Connection

(#25, 7). Netstumbler is the best known Windows tool for finding open wireless access points ('wardriving'). They also distribute a WinCE version for PDAs and such named. The tool is currently free but Windows-only and no source code is provided. It uses a more active approach to finding WAPs than passive sniffers such as.

Mac wireless settings

Latest release: version 0.4.0 on April 1, 2004 (14 years, 8 months ago). (#90, ) inSSIDer is a wireless network scanner for Windows, OS X, and Android. It was designed to overcome limitations of, namely not working well on 64-bit Windows and Windows Vista. InSSIDer can find open wireless access points, track signal strength over time, and save logs with GPS records. Latest release: version 4.1.0 on Jan. 22, 2015 (3 years, 10 months ago).

(#97, 42). This popular wireless stumbler for Mac OS X offers many of the features of its namesake, though the codebase is entirely different. Unlike console-based Kismet, KisMAC offers a pretty GUI and was around before Kismet was ported to OS X. It also offers mapping, Pcap-format import and logging, and even some decryption and deauthentication attacks. Latest release: version 0.3.3 on Feb. 7, 2011 (7 years, 10 months ago). 5 tools Categories.